Center for Criminal Justice ResearchCenter for Criminal Justice ResearchUniversity of Cincinnati

Center for Criminal Justice Research

Staff

Jim Frank

James Frank
Professor and Interim Director
Email: James.Frank@uc.edu 
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Professor Frank received his J.D. from Ohio Northern University in 1977 and PhD from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University in 1993. Dr. Frank has been the principal investigator for a number of policing-related research projects that primarily focus on under-standing police behavior at the street-level. Since arriving at the University of Cincinnati, he has also been involved with projects that assess the crime survey of the International Association of Healthcare Safety and Security, a study assessing the organization and effectiveness of Ohio's multijurisdictional drug task forces, and a project examining juror understanding of death penalty instructions. Dr. Frank has published policing articles in Justice Quarterly, Police Quarterly, the American Journal of Police, and Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategy and Management. He teaches courses in the areas of policing and legal issues in the criminal justice system.

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Michael Benson
Professor and Director of the Center for Criminal Justice Research
Email: Michael.Benson@uc.edu
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Professor Benson received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Illinois in 1982. Writing mainly in the areas of white-collar and corporate crime, he has published extensively in leading journals, including Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Journal of Research and Delinquency, American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, and Social Problems. He received the Outstanding Scholarship Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems Division on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency for his co-authored book, Combating Corporate Crime: Local Prosecutors at Work. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control, as well as private research foundations. His most recent projects are a book, Crime and the Life Course: An Introduction, and a grant from the Centers for Disease Control to investigate the effects of domestic violence on the development of children. He teaches criminological theory, white-collar crime, and life-course theory.

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Sandra Lee Browning
Associate Professor
Email: Sandra.Browning@uc.edu

Professor Browning received her doctorate in sociology at the University of Cincinnati. She previously was on the faculty of Eastern Kentucky University. She is an American Sociological Association Minority Fellow, as well as an American Society of Criminology Minority Fellow. Within the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, she has served numerous times as chairperson of the Affirmative Action Committee. She is also an active member in the Southern Sociological Society, serving as a member of the Black Caucus and as a member of the Association of Black Sociologists. At the University of Cincinnati, she is also an affiliate of the Department of Women's Studies. She has published on the impact of race on attitudes toward crime and justice. Her current research interests are in the areas of crime and the underclass, the institutionalization of black males, and the role of race in shaping views of the criminal justice system. She teaches law and social control, critical perspectives in criminal justice, women and crime, and teaching practicum.

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Nicholas Corsaro
Assistant Professor
Email: Nicholas.Corsaro@uc.edu
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Nicholas Corsaro is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.  He received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2007.  His research focuses on strategic crime prevention programs directed by law enforcement, problem-oriented policing, program evaluation, and research methods.  Recently, he has served as a principle investigator and researcher for a number of state and federally funded projects that evaluate strategies designed to disrupt open-air drug markets within targeted neighborhoods.  His recent publications have appeared in Crime & Delinquency, Evaluation Review, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, and the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

 

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Francis T. Cullen
Distinguished Research Professor
Email: Francis.Cullen@uc.edu
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Professor Cullen received his PhD in sociology and education from Columbia University in 1979. He is past editor of Justice Quarterly and Journal of Crime and Justice, and was president of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. He is a fellow of both the ACJS and the American Society of Criminology. He is author of Rethinking Crime and Deviance Theory and is co-author of Reaffirming Rehabilitation, Corporate Crime Under Attack: The Ford Pinto Case and Beyond, Criminological Theory: Context and Consequences, Criminology, and Combating Corporate Crime: Local Prosecutors at Work. He is co-editor of Contemporary Criminological Theory, Offender Rehabilitation: Effective Correctional Intervention, and Criminological Theory: Past to Present - Essential Readings. He teaches theory and philosophy of corrections, structural theories of crime, early intervention in criminal justice, and criminal justice research practicum.

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John E. Eck
Professor
Email: John.Eck@uc.edu

Professor Eck is a 1994 PhD in criminology from the University of Maryland. He has conducted research into police operations since 1977, and served as the Research Director for the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). At PERF, he spearheaded the development of problem-oriented policing throughout the U.S. He was also the Evaluation Coordinator for Law Enforcement at the Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, and a consultant to the London Metropolitan Police, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Police Foundation, and other organizations. Dr. Eck has written on criminal investigations, drug markets and control, crime mapping, and crime places. Research interests are the concentration of crime at places and prevention, crime displacement, criminal investigations, and the investigation of police misconduct. He is a member of the National Academy of Science panel assessing police research and policy. He teaches police effectiveness, research methods, and policy analysis.

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Robin Engel
Associate Professor
Email: Robin.Engel@uc.edu
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Dr. Engel is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati and Director of the Institute of Crime Science. She received her doctorate in criminal justice from the University at Albany, State University of New York.  Her research includes empirical assessments of police behavior, police/minority relations, police supervision and management, criminal justice policies, criminal gangs, and violence reduction strategies. Dr. Engel served as the Principal Investigator for over 40 contracts and grants totaling nearly six million dollars, and provides statistical and policy consulting for international, state, and municipal law enforcement agencies. She has testified before local and state legislative bodies, and provided expert testimony in criminal and civil racial profiling litigation. Based on her work in violence reduction, police-academic partnerships, and police-minority relations, she has been an invited speaker in numerous cities within the United States, Canada, England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Turkey, and Trinidad and Tobago.  For the last four years she has been ranked among the top five academics, and the number one female in the field of criminal justice/criminology based on scholarly publications in the most elite peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Engel’s most recent work is focused on homicide reduction in Cincinnati, New Orleans, New Haven, and other cities across the U.S. She serves as the Principal Investigator for the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence (CIRV). The CIRV team was awarded the 2008 National Criminal Justice Association’s Outstanding Criminal Justice Program Award, 2008 International Association of Chiefs of Police/Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement, and 2009 International Association of Chiefs of Police / West Award for Excellence in Criminal Investigations. Dr. Engel was also the recipient and selected speaker for the 2008 H.C. Buck Niehoff’s Evening with a Great Professor. She teaches criminal justice and policing courses at the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral levels at the University of Cincinnati.

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Bonnie S. Fisher
Professor
Email: Bonnie.Fisher@uc.edu
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Professor Fisher received her PhD in political science from Northwestern University in 1988. She served three years on the faculty of the department of city and regional planning at the Ohio State University before joining the faculty at UC in 1991. Dr. Fisher was the principal investigator for four federally funded research projects involving the victimization of college students, the sexual victimization of college women, violence against college women, and campus-level responses to a report of sexual assault. Her research interests include issues concerning crimes against and within small businesses, fear of crime, crime prevention and security, and the measurement of victimization and attitudes. She has published in Criminology, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Research in Crime and Delinquency, Violence and Victims, and Crime and Delinquency. Dr. Fisher is the co-editor of the Security Journal.

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Edward J. Latessa
Professor and Interim Dean
Email: Edward.Latessa@uc.edu
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Edward J. Latessa received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 1979 and is Interim Dean and Professor of the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services at the University of Cincinnati.  Dr. Latessa has published over 140 works in the area of criminal justice, corrections, and juvenile justice.  He is co-author of seven books including Corrections in the Community, and Corrections in America. Professor Latessa has directed over 150 funded research projects including studies of day reporting centers, juvenile justice programs, drug courts, prison programs, intensive supervision programs, halfway houses, and drug programs. He and his staff have also assessed over 600 correctional programs throughout the United States, and he has provided assistance and workshops in over forty-five states. Dr. Latessa served as President of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (1989-90).  He has also received several awards including; Marguerite Q. Warren and Ted B. Palmer Differential Intervention Award presented by the Division of Corrections and Sentencing of the American Society of Criminology (2010), Outstanding Community Partner Award from the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (2010), Maud Booth Correctional Services Award in recognition of dedicated service and leadership presented by the Volunteers of America (2010), Community Hero Award presented by Community Resources for Justice, (2010), the Bruce Smith Award for outstanding contributions to criminal justice by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2010), the George Beto Scholar, College of Criminal Justice, Sam Houston State University, (2009), the Mark Hatfield Award for Contributions in public policy research by The Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University (2008), the Outstanding Achievement Award by the National Juvenile Justice Court Services Association (2007), the August Vollmer Award from the American Society of Criminology (2004), the Simon Dinitz Criminal Justice Research Award from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (2002), the Margaret Mead Award for dedicated service to the causes of social justice and humanitarian advancement by the International Community Corrections Association (2001), the Peter P. Lejins Award for Research from the American Correctional Association (1999); ACJS Fellow Award (1998); ACJS Founders Award (1992); and the Simon Dinitz award by the Ohio Community Corrections Organization.

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Sarah Manchak
Assistant Professor
Email: Sarah.Manchak@uc.edu
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Sarah Manchak is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine in 2011.  Her research primarily focuses on individuals with serious mental illness who are involved in the criminal justice system. Her dissertation examined the nature and effects of client-provider relationships in mandated treatment settings. She has also previously coordinated a multi-site study of specialty mental health probation, which was funded by the MacArthur Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment, and a NIMH-funded study of psychiatric patients with dual mental and substance diagnoses at risk for violence and self-harm. Her work seeks to inform risk assessment, community supervision, and treatment practices for this high-risk/high-need population.

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John Schwartz
Senior Research Associate and Associate Director CCJR
Email: John.Schwartz@uc.edu
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John has worked for the School of Criminal Justice since 1996. Over his tenure, he has been responsible for managing several grants and contracts on both a large and small scale. As Associate Director of the Center for Criminal Justice Research, John is responsible for working with funding agencies and the University administration throughout the whole grant and contract process which includes contract negotiations, invoicing, human subject compliance, and closing the grant. In addition to managing staff and the day to day activities of research projects, John has also published articles in peer reviewed journals such as the Journal of Criminal Justice and the Journal of Criminal Justice Education.

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Paula Smith
Assistant Professor / Director of UCCI
Email: Paula.Smith@uc.edu
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Dr. Paula Smith is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice and Director of the Corrections Institute at the University of Cincinnati. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of New Brunswick, Saint John in 2006. Her research interests include offender classification and assessment, correctional rehabilitation, the psychological effects of incarceration, program implementation and evaluation, the transfer of knowledge to practitioners and policy-makers, and meta-analysis. She is co-author of Corrections in the Community, and has also authored more than thirty journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Smith has directed numerous federal and state funded research projects, including studies of prisons, community-based correctional programs, juvenile drug courts, probation and parole departments, and mental health services. Furthermore, she has been involved in evaluations of more than 280 correctional programs throughout the United States. In addition to her research experience, Dr. Smith has considerable frontline experience working with a variety of offender populations, including juvenile offenders, sex offenders, and perpetrators of domestic violence.  Currently, she provides training and technical assistance to criminal justice agencies throughout the United States and Canada.

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Christopher Sullivan
Assistant Professor
Email: sullivc6@ucmail.uc.edu
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Christopher J. Sullivan is an Associate Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.  He received his doctorate from Rutgers University in 2005.  His research interests include developmental, life-course criminology; juvenile delinquency and prevention policy; and research methodology and analytic methods.  He has published 50 peer review articles and several book chapters.  His recent work has appeared in Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Criminal Justice and Behavior, and Justice Quarterly.  He is associate editor for the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency  and a member of the editorial boards for Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, Deviant Behavior, and Victims & Offenders.  Currently, he is Principal Investigator for the state-funded Ohio Disproportionate Minority Contact Assessment. 

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Lawrence F. Travis III
Professor
Email: Lawrence.Travis@uc.edu
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Professor Travis is the Director of the Center for Criminal Justice Research at the University of Cincinnati. His PhD in criminal justice is from SUNY-Albany, 1982. He served as research director for the Oregon State Board of Parole and as a research analyst for the National Parole Institutes. He is co-author of Changes in Sentencing and Parole Decision Making: 1976-1978 and Policing in America: A Balance of Forces. He has edited both Corrections: An Issues Approach and Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections: A Reader. He co-edited Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, and contributes to criminal justice journals. His research interests lie in policing, criminal justice policy reform, sentencing, and corrections. He teaches the pro-seminar on the administration of criminal justice, theory and philosophy of law enforcement, and the seminar in criminal justice theory.

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Patricia Van Voorhis
Emeritus Professor
Email: Pat.VanVoorhis@uc.edu
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Professor Van Voorhis is a 1983 PhD in criminal justice from SUNY-Albany. She served on the faculty of the Department of Criminology at Indiana State University prior to assuming her current position at UC. She is a past deputy editor of Justice Quarterly, a past president of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association, and currently serves as co-founder and Vice President for the Division of Sentencing and Corrections for the American Society of Criminology. She has published in leading criminal justice journals such as Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Criminal Justice and Behavior, and Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. She is the author of Psychological Classification of the Adult, Male, Prison Inmate, and co-author of Correctional Rehabilitation and Counseling. She has directed several state and federally-funded research projects pertaining to prison classification, gender-responsive classification and correctional treatment in both community and institutional settings. She teaches individual theories of crime, applied research, seminar in correction rehabilitation, and women's studies.

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Pamela Wilcox
Associate Professor
Email: Pamela.Wilcox@uc.edu
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Pamela Wilcox received her Ph.D. in Sociology at Duke University in 1994. She was on the faculty in Sociology at University of Kentucky from 1994-2004. Her research focuses on multilevel crime control, with special interest in integrating components of routine activities theory and social disorganization theory in order to understand crime and victimization risk within school and community contexts. She recently co-authored Criminal Circumstance: A Dynamic Multicontextual Criminal Opportunity Theory. Recent articles have appeared in The Sociological Quarterly, Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, Criminal Justice, Violence and Victims, and Journal of School Violence. She serves as co-investigator on the Rural Substance abuse and Violence Project, a four-year longitudinal study of trajectories of drug use and school-based offending/victimization among a panel of Kentucky youth. She is also co-investigator on a cross-sectional study of women’s experiences with sexual, physical and stalking victimization at the U. of Kentucky.

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John D. Wooldredge
Professor
Email: John.Wooldredge@uc.edu
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Professor Wooldredge is a 1986 PhD in sociology from the University of Illinois . His research and publications focus on issues related to sentencing, institutional corrections, and research methods. He is currently involved in research on sentencing disparities based on a defendant's neighborhood of residence (in Ohio ), sex-based disparities in sentencing, and the correlates/causes of inmate crime and victimization in U.S. prisons. P ublications have recently appeared or are forthcoming in Law and Society Review , Criminology , Crime and Delinquency , and Journal of Criminal Justice . H e teaches institutional corrections, the required graduate sequence in statistics, advanced data analysis, and a series of electives focusing on specific issues/techniques in research methods and data analysis.

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John Wright
Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
Email: John.Wright@uc.edu
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Professor Wright received his doctorate in 1996 from the Criminal Justice program at the University of Cincinnati. Afterwards, he served five years on the faculty at East Tennessee State University in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology. Dr. Wright has published numerous articles and books and consults regularly with various criminal justice agencies. His work can be found in leading criminal justice, genetic, and psychological, and psychiatric journals. His most recent book is Life-Course Criminality: Criminals in the Making. Dr. Wright's focus is on the development of criminal violence across the life-course, especially biological and genetic factors related to behavioral maladaptation. His work also seeks to integrate findings from a number of disciplines, including human behavioral genetics, psychology, and biology. He currently teaches Biosocial Criminology at the undergraduate level and Life-Course Criminology and Criminal Offender at the graduate level.

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