Great Streets and Gateways
Spring 2011 | Winter 2011 | Fall 2010 | Spring 2010 | Winter 2010 | Fall 2009 | Summer 2009 | Spring 2009 | Winter 2009 | Fall 2008

Spring 2011:
Three Futures for our City and Suburbs
In the Spring quarter of 2011, three different courses explored alternatives for improving Cincinnati and its suburbs.
Student Photos
Open house and presentation photos

Engineering Sustainability for the Cincinnati Museum Center
Engineering students finished their senior capstone projects concerning sustainability in the area surrounding the Cincinnati Museum Center.
View student work

A Catalytic Project for the Future Downtown Casino District
Master of Community Planning students explored possibilities for using Cincinnati’s downtown casino development as a catalyst for neighborhood improvements in Pendleton.
View student work

Research in Best Practices for Sustainable Communities
Students of the Sustainable Urbanism seminar class produced case studies of sustainable communities, focusing on application of sustainability theory.
View student work

Winter 2011:
Envisioning a Sustainable Future for the Cincinnati Museum Center and its District
During the Winter quarter 2011 studio, six groups of engineering students produced proposals for traffic alternatives for the intersection of Ezzard Charles Dr, Western Ave and Winchell Ave; options for replacing the I-75 bridge at the Ezzard Charles intersection with a landmark structure in Cincinnati; a new exhibit area in the museum for educating youth about stormwater management and water efficient appliances; possible applications of geothermal energy and natural lighting into the Museum’s existing structure that increases the use of renewable energy; replacing the CMC’s surface parking area with an innovative parking structure and a green roof including gardens, an urban farm, and bioswales that slow stormwater runoff. This course was led by Dr. Richard Miller of the College of Engineering and Professor Frank Russell of the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning.

Student posters
CMC Access Improvement poster 1
CMC Access Improvement poster 2
Ezzard Charles Bridge Replacement Project
Environmental Education at CMC
Geothermal and Natural Lighting
Underground Parking Structure for CMC
Stormwater Runoff Reduction
Fall 2010:
Envisioning a Sustainable Future for the Cincinnati Museum Center and its District
During the Fall Quarter of 2010 fifty-five students of architecture, planning, and engineering participated in an effort led by the Cincinnati Museum Center to address sustainability issues within the historic Union terminal and surrounding Queensgate area. To open the quarter, students and faculty, including Michael Zaretsky, Frank Russell, and Richard Miller, joined private consultants from Arup Engineers, Glaserworks Architects, Human Nature Landscape Architects, and Preservation Design Consultants in a three day workshop to define a broad variety of sustainability issues ranging from transportation practices to architectural energy systems.

While the professional consultants developed technical recommendations, Niehoff Studio students formed five teams to consider sustainability measures for the CMC and its district at different scales.

An open house was held to exhibit student work at the Cincinnati Museum Center on December 9th, 2010and this exhibit continued to be on display until December 22nd, 2010. Engineering students continue their parallel work on energy systems, transportation, parking, and environmental issues through the spring quarter.

Student Photos

Student Project Teams
EcoDistrict
District Corriror
District
Landscape
Building
Spring 2010:
Mill Creek Watershed Scenario Project / Engineering Capstone Project
Master of Community Planning students took part this quarter in a comprehensive planning workshop that considered the entire 166 square mile watershed of the Mill Creek through Hamilton and Butler Counties. This Workshop used the scenario planning approach to establish four plausible outcomes for the watershed. Scenario planning seeks to open discussions about how things may unfold, providing the opportunity for individuals and organizations to look beyond their individual plans and concerns for the future.

Student Photos
Report
Project Website
Scenario Planning Projects

Concurrently, undergraduate students of civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering worked to extend the projects they had started during the winter quarter - Remaking the Urban Highway Context.

Engineering Projects

Winter 2010:
Remaking the Urban Highway Context
In the winter quarter of 2010, students of urban planning, architecture, civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, structural engineering, and political science worked to further develop student work from the previous quarter. Projects that quarter focused on the I-71 and I-75 corridors in the neighborhoods of Avondale, Walnut Hills, Camp Washington, Northside, South Cumminsville, and Winton Place. After analyzing previous student work, case studies, and the neighborhoods themselves, students developed new framework plans, urban design proposals and implementation strategies.

Reconnaissance
Design


Student Photos
Report
Fall 2009:
I-71 and I-75
The fall quarter 2009 is the beginning of the second year of this cycle. Students of urban planning, architecture, civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering were assigned to work on the I-71 and I-75 corridors in the uptown area. They focused their analysis on the neighborhoods of Avondale, Walnut Hills, Camp Washington, Northside, South Cumminsville, and Winton Place to come up with a framework plan, urban design proposals and implementation strategies.

Reconnaissance
Urban Design and Implemementation


Student Photos
Report
Summer 2009:
Public Spaces Along the MLK-Madison Corridor
In the summer quarter 2009, undergraduate students of urban planning studied the characteristics, uses, users, roles, and design of public spaces. Their work consisted of applying different methodologies to analyze public spaces located in neighborhoods along the MLK/Madison Corridor, namely Burnet Woods in Clifton, Bellevue Park in Clifton Heights, and Hyde Park Square in Hyde Park. Each analysis focused on specific aspects of public spaces. The first observation consisted of an analysis of the neighborhood’s characteristics that impact social and pedestrian life and how these characteristics relate to the creation of a sense of community. The second observation addressed the main public space in each neighborhood and quantitavely analyzed characteristics that either encourage or prevent use. Finally, students observed physical characteristics and user behavior based on William Whyte’s methods.

Burnet Woods in The Heights
Bellevue Hill Park in the CUF
Hyde Park Square in Hyde Park


Spring 2009:
MLK-Madison Corridor and the Milacron site

In the spring quarter 2009 Niehoff Studio, students of architecture, civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering worked independently on projects focused on two different areas.

With counsel from the City department of economic development and the Oakley community council, three teams of architecture students created mixed-use redevelopment simulations for the Milacron site, a former industrial site along the MLK/Madison corridor in the neighborhood of Oakley. This site has been the subject of a number of unimplemented development proposals (the Millworks project) and is occupied with a mix of vacant and active industrial/manufacturing facilities, the Crossroads mega-church, and a big box retail complex (Center of Cincinnati).

Six groups of engineering students worked on different aspects related to the improvement of natural and built environments along the MLK/Madison corridor. Continuing the work completed in the previous quarters at the studio, engineers were able to develop detailed proposals for the corridor with focus on the Madisonville area that include roadway, right-of-way and rail-bridge design and green engineering for stormwater and stream management.

Also during the spring quarter 2009, graduate students in architecture and undergraduate students of the honors program from a variety of disciplines worked on individual projects focusing on the analysis of urban issues in or near the MLK-Madison corridor. The theme of each projects was defined by the students and the methodological and theoretical approach of each proposal was based on theories discussed during the seminar "Urbanism: Observing the City."

Architecture Work
Engineering Work
Urbanism: Observing the City


Student Photos
Report
Winter 2009:
MLK-Madison Corridor and Madisonville

In the winter quarter 2009 Niehoff Studio, students of urban planning, architecture, civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering collaborated on analyzing and producing urban design recommendations for the neighborhood of Madisonville. Students completed assignments both as interdisciplinary teams and as individuals.

Analytical Work
Precedent Study
Urban Design and Implementation

Student Photos
Report
Fall 2008:
MLK-Madison Corridor and Camp Washington

In the fall quarter 2008 Niehoff Studio, students of urban planning, civil engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, and structural engineering collaborated on analyzing and producing urban design recommendations for two focus areas: the Hopple Street - Martin Luther King Drive - Madison Road corridor as a whole and the neighborhood of Camp Washington. Student work for the quarter is divided into two groups: Analytical Work and Urban Design Projects.

Analytical Work
Urban Design Projects

Student Photos