Institute of Crime ScienceUniversity of CincinnatiInstitute of Crime Science

Institute of Crime Science

Members

Michael Benson

Michael L. Benson

Michael L. Benson received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Illinois in 1982 and is a Professor and Director of the Distance Learning Masters Program in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.  Writing mainly in the areas of white-collar and corporate crime, he has published extensively in leading journals, including Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Journal of Research and Delinquency, American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, and Social Problems. He received the Outstanding Scholarship Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems Division on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency for his co-authored book, Combating Corporate Crime: Local Prosecutors at Work. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control, as well as private research foundations. His most recent book is White-Collar Crime: An Opportunity Perspective, co-authored with Sally S. Simpson.  He is currently revising his book, Crime and the Life Course: An Introduction for a second edition.

Curriculum Vitae

Nicholas Corsaro

Nicholas Corsaro

Nicholas Corsaro is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.  He received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2007.  His research focuses on strategic crime prevention programs directed by law enforcement, problem-oriented policing, program evaluation, and research methods.  Recently, he has served as a principle investigator and researcher for a number of state and federally funded projects that evaluate strategies designed to disrupt open-air drug markets within targeted neighborhoods.  His recent publications have appeared in Crime & Delinquency, Evaluation Review, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, and the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Curruculum Vitae

 

John Eck

John Eck

John Eck is a 1994 PhD in criminology from the University of Maryland. He has conducted research into police operations since 1977, and served as the Research Director for the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). At PERF, he spearheaded the development of problem-oriented policing throughout the U.S. He was also the Evaluation Coordinator for Law Enforcement at the Washington/Baltimore High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, and a consultant to the London Metropolitan Police, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Police Foundation, and other organizations.

Curriculum Vitae

Robin Engel

Robin S. Engel

Robin S. Engel is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati and Director of the University of Cincinnati Institute of Crime Science (ICS). Dr. Engel’s research involves understanding police decision-making through empirical assessments of police behavior, police supervision and management, and police response toward minority citizens. Dr. Engel has served as the Principal Investigator for multiple contracts and grants, and provides statistical and policy consulting for numerous state and local police agencies. She has testified before local and state legislative bodies, and provided expert testimony in criminal and civil racial profiling litigation.

Curriculum Vitae

James Frank

James Frank

James Frank is Professor in the Division of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. He is received his doctorate in Criminal Justice from Michigan State University in 1993 and his Juris Doctorate from Ohio Northern University in 1977. His primary research interests are in the areas of street-level police behavior, citizen attitudes toward the police, use of technology and the evaluation of police policies.

Curriculum Vitae

Edward Latessa

Edward J. Latessa

Edward J. Latessa received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 1979 and is a Professor and Director of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Latessa has published over 110 works in the area of criminal justice, corrections, and juvenile justice.  He is co-author of seven books including Corrections in the Community, and Corrections in America. Professor Latessa has directed over 100 funded research projects including studies of day reporting centers, juvenile justice programs, drug courts, intensive supervision programs, halfway houses, and drug programs. He and his staff have also assessed over 550 correctional programs throughout the United States, and he has provided assistance and workshops in forty-five states. Dr. Latessa served as President of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (1989-90).

Curriculum Vitae

Paula Smith

Paula Smith

Paula Smith is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice and Director of the Corrections Institute at the University of Cincinnati. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of New Brunswick, Saint John in 2006. Her research interests include offender classification and assessment, correctional rehabilitation, the psychological effects of incarceration, program implementation and evaluation, the transfer of knowledge to practitioners and policy-makers, and meta-analysis. She is co-author of Corrections in the Community, and has also authored more than thirty journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Smith has directed numerous federal and state funded research projects, including studies of prisons, community-based correctional programs, juvenile drug courts, probation and parole departments, and mental health services. Furthermore, she has been involved in evaluations of more than 280 correctional programs throughout the United States. In addition to her research experience, Dr. Smith has considerable frontline experience working with a variety of offender populations, including juvenile offenders, sex offenders, and perpetrators of domestic violence.  Currently, she provides training and technical assistance to criminal justice agencies throughout the United States and Canada.

Christopher Sullivan

Christopher J. Sullivan

Christopher J. Sullivan is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. He received his doctorate at the Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice in 2005. His research interests include developmental criminology; juvenile delinquency and prevention policy; and research methodology and analytic methods. He has worked on several locally, state, and federally funded research projects studying various correctional and preventive interventions aimed at offenders. His recent work has appeared in Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, British Journal of Criminology, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, and the Journal of Experimental Criminology.

Curriculum Vitae

Lawrence Travis

Lawrence F. Travis

Lawrence F. Travis earned his PhD in Criminal Justice from SUNY-Albany, 1982. He served as research director for the Oregon State Board of Parole and as a research analyst for the National Parole Institutes. He is co-author of Changes in Sentencing and Parole Decision Making: 1976-1978 and Policing in America: A Balance of Forces. He has edited both Corrections: An Issues Approach and Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections: A Reader. He edits Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, and contributes to criminal justice journals. His research interests lie in policing, criminal justice policy reform, sentencing, and corrections.

Curriculum Vitae

Pamela Wilcox

Pamela Wilcox

Pamela Wilcox received her Ph.D. in Sociology at Duke University in 1994. Her research focuses on multilevel crime control/prevention, with special interest in integrating components of routine activities theory and social disorganization theory in order to understand crime and victimization risk within school and community contexts. She is author (with Kenneth C. Land and Scott A. Hunt) of Criminal Circumstance: A Dynamic Multicontextual Criminal Opportunity Theory (Aldine de Gruyter 2003), and she is co-editor (with Francis T. Cullen) of the Encyclopedia of Criminological Theory and The Oxford Handbook of Criminological Theory.  Recent articles have appeared in Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Violence and Victims, and Journal of School Violence.

Curriculum Vitae

John Paul Wright

John Paul Wright

John Paul Wright received his doctorate in 1996 from the Criminal Justice program at the University of Cincinnati. Afterwards, he served five years on the faculty at East Tennessee State University in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology. Dr. Wright has published numerous articles and books and consults regularly with various criminal justice agencies. His work can be found in leading criminal justice, genetic, and psychological, and psychiatric journals. His most recent book is Life-Course Criminality: Criminals in the Making.  Dr. Wright's focus is on the development of criminal violence across the life-course, especially biological and genetic factors related to behavioral maladaptation. His work also seeks to integrate findings from a number of disciplines, including human behavioral genetics, psychology, and biology.

Curriculum Vitae

Roger Wright

Roger Wright

Roger Wright is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Chase College of Law and his Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from Memphis State University. He has also attended Oxford University in England. Prior to coming to UC in 1984, he was a law partner with Walter and Wright. He has also served as a police officer in Memphis, Tennessee and has additional experience in juvenile corrections. He was provided training and promotional exams for many local law enforcement agencies and was recently awarded the University College Teaching Award. He also coaches high school tennis, practices taekwondo and plays guitar like a madman.