Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

DACA Form

What is DACA?

On June 15, 2012, President Obama created a new policy calling for deferred action for certain undocumented young people who came to the U.S. as children. Applications under the program, which is called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), began on August 15, 2012.

On September 5, 2017, President Trump announced that Deferred Action for Early Childhood Arrivals was being rescinded and that new applications for individuals seeking Deferred Action status would no longer be accepted. DACA recipients whose status was expiring between September 5, 2017 and March 5, 2018 could apply for a two-year renewal. Applications for renewals had to be received by October 5, 2017.

On January 9, 2018, U.S. District Court judge William Alsup ordered a nation-wide temporary injunction on the Trump Administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, stating the decision to end the program was based on a, “flawed legal premise.” This decision orders the federal government to resume accepting renewal applications from anyone who had DACA status before Sept. 5, 2017. The USCIS was ordered to post “reasonable public notice” on the process to apply to renew DACA.

On April 24, 2018, Washington DC federal judge John Bates ruled that  the Trump administration’s claim that DACA was unconstitutional “was virtually unexplained.” As a result, he has given the administration 90 days to better explain why DACA is unconstitutional. This opens the door potentially for those who have never held DACA status before, but who otherwise qualify, to apply for DACA protection. Currently, only those hold the status or held the status prior to September 5, 2016 can apply for extensions. This ruling could change that by the end of July. We will monitor the administration’s response to ruling and update this site when more details are available.

USCIS is now accepting applications for DACA renewal for anyone who previously received DACA status and whose deferred action had expired on or after September 5, 2016. It also means that those with current DACA statuses that expire in the future now have a window to file for renewals. Those with expirations that are more than 150 days out but less than one year, may also be able to file for a two year extension, although the certainty of those approvals are less than those expiring in the next 150 days.

As long as your DACA status is valid, it might be possible to qualify for in-state tuition while studying at the University of Cincinnati. This page will describe the procedures necessary to establish your DACA status and the processes you will need to follow to be considered for in-state tuition.

 

Who Qualifies for DACA Status?

You may request consideration of DACA if you:

  • Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012
  • Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday
  • Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time
  • Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012 and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS
  • Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012, meaning that you never had a lawful immigration status on or before June 15, 2012, or any lawful immigration status or parole that you obtained prior to June 15, 2012, had expired as of June 15, 2012
  • Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a General Educational Development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States
  • Have not been convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety

To get started, the U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services website will help answer some of your questions regarding your immigration status and how to request consideration for DACA. There, you can find out more information about the DACA process, background checks, fees, etc.

Application Process - Overview

Step 1

DACA students should complete the appropriate application for admission to UC.

Step 2

Upon admission, provide the documents establishing your immigration status to UC International Services.

Step 3

Provide the University Registrar’s Office with documentation regarding your sources of support and residential address.


Application to UC and Establishing Your Status as a DACA Student

The University of Cincinnati defines an International Student as any enrolled student who is not a U.S. citizen, permanent resident of the United States, asylee or refugee. As such, if you hold DACA status or are in the process of obtaining DACA status, you are classified as an international student and should apply accordingly. This means listing that you are not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and listing that your country of citizenship is something other than the U.S. when completing application materials.

Once you are admitted to the University of Cincinnati, you will receive communication from UC International Services asking you to clarify your immigration status. You should follow the instructions given and provide our office with copies of the following documents:

  • Your Passport Bibliography page (page with your picture and personal details) if you have one
  • A copy of your I-797 Notice of Action (approval notice) from USCIS for your I-821D application for Deferred Action status
  • A copy of your Employment Authorization Document (EAD)


Sample I-797

Notice

Sample EAD

EAD


Frequently Asked Questions

What requirements must I meet to be considered an Ohio resident
for tuition purposes?

Applicants must have attended and graduated from an Ohio high school or qualify through one of the various guidelines established by the Ohio Board of Regents.

Students living in Indiana and Kentucky may be eligible for Metropolitan or Reciprocity rate tuition programs. For a complete list of the guidelines please visit the residency reciprocity website.


Should I complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?

DACA students are NOT eligible for federal financial aid.  They are eligible for any university based scholarship or assistantship that is offered.  Please see the scholarship section for more details.


My DACA application is currently in process.  Can I apply for admission now? 

You may apply for admission, but you will not be considered for Ohio residency classification (in-state tuition rates) without documentation of DACA approval.


Are tuition payment plans available?

The University of Cincinnati offers a Tution Payment Plan for those students who need to spread their tuition and fees bill across the term.


I have other questions.  Who can help?

Questions about application for admission should be addressed to:

International Admissions Office (undergraduate applicants) 513-556-2069 international.admissions@uc.edu

The Graduate School (graduate applicants) grad.uc.edu/admissions

Questions about your Immigration documents/status

UC International Services 513-556-4278 orInternational.students@uc.edu

Questions about your status for tuition purposes residency

Registrar’s office resid@ucmail.uc.edu

Frequently Asked Questions

I was eligible to file for a DACA renewal prior to the October 5, 2017 deadline but failed to do so (or the application was denied). Can I now file for a renewal?

Yes, USCIS is now accepting applications for DACA renewal for anyone who previously received DACA status and whose deferred action had expired on or after September 5, 2016.

 

My DACA status expires after March 5, 2018.  How soon can I file for a renewal of my DACA status?

USCIS makes reference to the “optional filing window”, which is no early than 5 months (150 days) before and no later than four months (120 days) prior to the expiration of your current DACA status. Anyone with DACA status expiring between March 6, 2018 through and the end of June should apply now. You should be able to file for an extension up to one year before the expiration of your current DACA status without fear of denial. It is not clear how long this window of opportunity will remain open so those with expiring DACA status should file now.

 

I have never filed for DACA even though I was eligible.  Can I now file for DACA status?

Unfortunately, no. USCIS is not accepting initial applications from individuals who did not previously hold DACA status. However, the recent ruling by judge Bates may make an application possible in 90 days.  If the Trump administration does not make a convincing argument as to why DACA is unconstitutional, new DACA application might be able to be filed as early as the end of July. 

 

I am currently authorized for DACA status and it expires soon. What should I do?

You need to make sure that you apply for a renewal of your DACA status by October 5, 2017. This should result in the granting of two additional years of DACA status. Please do not miss the filing deadline. Please make sure you provide a copy of your updated approval notice and work permit to UC International Services once they are received. Currently, there are court order that allow those who currently hold DACA status to apply for renewals, but that could change at any time.

 

If DACA or some kind of DACA replacement is not passed by March 5, 2018 what will happen to my status as a UC student?

Regardless of what happens with DACA, you will still be a University of Cincinnati student. Those in programs that require co-op or other forms of employment will need to consider changing majors to one that doesn’t have work requirements. In addition, your tuition residency may need to be changed from in-state to out-of-state.

 

If I would like to travel for academic or personal reasons am I able to apply for advance parole?

The DHS will not approve any new Form I-131 applications for advance parole. If already approved for advance parole you should be able to travel during the validity of the approved period. However, CBP retains the authority it has always had in determining the admissibility of any person presenting at the border and the eligibility of such persons for parole. As such, you should consider carefully the need to travel. If you currently have an I-131 application for advance parole pending adjudication, DHS will administratively close the application and will refund all associated fees.

 

What will UC do to help ensure that DACA continues?

The University of Cincinnati will be working with our state and federal legislators to encourage them to support legislation that supports DACA and DACA eligible students.

 

What requirements must I meet to be considered an Ohio resident for tuition purposes?

Applicants must have attended and graduated from an Ohio high school or qualify through one of the various guidelines established by the Ohio Board of Regents.

Students living in Indiana and Kentucky may be eligible for Metropolitan or Reciprocity rate tuition programs. For a complete list of the guidelines please visit the residency reciprocity website.

 

How long will my Ohio residency status for tuition purposes continue?

Your tuition will remain at in-state tuition rates through the duration of your current approved DACA status. 

 

Should I complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)?

DACA students are NOT eligible for federal financial aid. They are eligible for any university based scholarship or assistantship that is offered.  Please see the scholarship section for more details.

 

Am I eligible to receive scholarships as a DACA student?

Yes, all DACA students are eligible for university based scholarships.  Undergraduate students can find out more details about available scholarships here. Graduate students can find more details here.    

The Office of Ethnic Programs and Services maintains a list of scholarship opportunities for undocumented students.

 

Are tuition payment plans available?

The University of Cincinnati offers a Tution Payment Plan for those students who need to spread their tuition and fees bill across the term.

 

If DACA is discontinued, do I need to be concerned about being arrested or deported?

We are hopeful that something will be enacted prior to March 5, 2018 that will keep you safe and eligible to work. If that doesn’t happen, some government officials have indicated that DACA recipients will not be targeted and deported. Priority for deportation will continue to be on undocumented immigrants who have committed crimes. However, once your current DACA status expires, if new legislation is not enacted, there are no guarantees what the Department of Homeland Security will do to those with expired DACA status. 

 

Is there someone I can talk to about how this decision is affecting me from an academic and personal standpoint?

Yes, UC’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is available to all students who would like additional counseling services given this difficult time. Their location and contact details are below.

 

I have other questions. Who can help?

Questions about application for admission should be addressed to:

International Admissions Office (undergraduate applicants)
513-556-2069 | international.admissions@uc.edu

The Graduate School (graduate applicants) 
grad.uc.edu/admissions

Questions about your Immigration documents/status:

UC International Services
513-556-4278 | International.students@uc.edu

Questions about your residency status for tuition purposes:

Registrar’s office 
resid@ucmail.uc.edu

Questions about counseling services:

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
225 Calhoun Street, Suite 221
Cincinnati, Ohio  45219
513.556.0648 | http://www.uc.edu/counseling.html

Useful Resources

DreamActivist.org

DreamActivist.org is a multicultural, migrant youth-led, social media hub for the movement to pass the DREAM Act and pursue the enactment of other forms of legislation that aim to mend the broken immigration system.

Dreamers Unidos

Networking and information site by and for Dreamers. Includes scholarship guides.

FAFSA Information for DACA Students

Information for DACA students about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Immigration Equality

FAQ to help answer questions about DACA, who is eligible, and what eligible youth can do next.

Dr. Paz Maya Oliverez for Latinos in College

Guidance, information, and support for undocumented high school and college students in their pursuit of higher education, as well as other first-generation college-goers.

United We Dream (UWD)

United We Dream (UWD) is the largest immigrant youth-led network in the nation.

Mission Asset Fund

Mission Asset Fund is providing grants for the renewal application fees.

Office of Ethnic Programs & Services

UC's Office of Ethnic Programs and Services maintains a list of resources and scholarship opportunities for undocumented students.

UC President & Provost Remarks

Dear UC Students,

The recommended elimination of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) is of great concern to us personally as leaders of the University of Cincinnati. UC has dozens of DACA students enrolled on multiple campuses across our university, and this decision jeopardizes their ability to complete their academic studies, maintain employment and contribute to the future well-being of their families and the Cincinnati community.

These students have grown up in the United States with the intention of living the American Dream. UC is committed to providing a diverse and inclusive environment to foster the learning and intellectual growth of all 45,000 UC students, including current and what we hope are future DACA students.

We are working with our elected officials in Congress to find an equitable solution that would allow these students to live and thrive in the United States and to continue their education at UC and other institutions of higher education across our country.

Sincerely,

Neville G. Pinto
President

Peter E. Landgren
Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

 

Letters to Representatives

On September 8, 2017, President Pinto sent letters to all Congress members from the state of Ohio urging them to take action and create legislation that would authorize DACA.

Support DACA

Although court rulings have stalled the end of the DACA program, there is no permanent solution yet in place. For DACA (or some form of the program) to continue, Congress will need to take action and approve formal legislation.

We support our DACA students at the University of Cincinnati. The University of Cincinnati will be working with our state and federal legislators to encourage them to support legislation that supports DACA and DACA eligible students.

Do you want to lend your voice? Consider writing to your representatives in Congress today.