Tangeman University Center

Tangeman University Center

UC Sustainability Film Series

UC has a regular series of films related to sustainability. These engaging documentaries, fiction films, and shorts all capture the diverse sustainability movement in unique ways. All film screenings are free and open to the public.


Planet Earth

August 26

A stunning experience that captures rare action, impossible locations and intimate moments with our planet's best-loved, wildest and most elusive creatures. From the highest mountains to the deepest rivers, this blockbuster series takes you on an unforgettable journey through the daily struggle for survival in Earth's most extreme habitats. Planet Earth takes you to places you have never seen before, to experience sights and sounds you may never experience anywhere else.


September 16 (7 p.m.)

Groundswell is director Chris Malloy's short film follow-up to 180' SOUTH. Surfers Dan Malloy, Trevor Gordon and Pete Devries set sail on a 68 foot sailboat guided by the Raincoast Conservation Foundation into British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest where a pipeline and oil tanker proposal looms. The team explores waves and a rainforest full of life while learning of the potential irreversible consequences of this project from local First Nations leaders. Groundswell beautifully and profoundly captures the spirit of this wild place and the passion of the Heiltsuk people who are committed to protecting it.

Project Wild Thing

September 30 (7 p.m.)

Project Wild Thing is a film led movement to get more kids (and their folks!) outside and reconnecting with nature. The film is an ambitious, feature-length documentary that takes a funny and revealing look at a complex issue, the increasingly disparate connection between children and nature.


October 14 (7 p.m.)

Urbanized Over half the world’s population now lives in an urban area, and 75% will call a city home by 2050. But while some cities are experiencing explosive growth, others are shrinking. The challenges of balancing housing, mobility, public space, civic engagement, economic development, and environmental policy are fast becoming universal concerns. Yet much of the dialogue on these issues is disconnected from the public domain. Who is allowed to shape our cities, and how do they do it?

Biophilic Design

October 19 (6 p.m.)

Biophilic Design is an innovative way of designing the places where we live, work, and learn. We need nature in a deep and fundamental fashion, but we have often designed our cities and suburbs in ways that both degrade the environment and alienate us from nature. Come on a journey from our evolutionary past and the origins of architecture to the world’s most celebrated buildings in a search for the architecture of life. Together, we will encounter buildings that connect people and nature - hospitals where patients heal faster, schools where children’s test scores are higher, offices where workers are more productive, and communities where people know more of their neighbors and families thrive. Biophilic Design points the way toward creating healthy and productive habitats for modern humans.


October 28 (7 p.m.)

This film, like many from director Werner Herzog, is a poem of oddness and beauty. Investigating the lives of the "professional dreamers" who conduct research at the bottom of the world in Antarctica, he finds a happily cynical lot, who regard climate change and the potential extinction of Homo sapiens in rather a different light than most people. They study penguins, seals, volcanoes, miniscule underwater creatures, and the shifting ice patterns. In this harsh yet beautiful place, where compasses are useless, and the climate is negative 70 degrees Fahrenheit, Herzog finds the scenery splendid, and McMurdo Station research center repellent. For viewers who have wondered why anyone would go to Antarctica, Herzog's film provides some interesting answers, and many scenes capturing the natural beauty of the ice continent.

Blade Runner

November 18 (7 p.m.)

Blade Runner The film depicts Los Angeles in November 2019, in which genetically engineered replicants, which are visually indistinguishable from adult humans, are manufactured by the powerful Tyrell Corporation as well as by other "mega-corporations" around the world. The use of replicants on Earth is banned and they are exclusively utilized for dangerous or menial work on off-world colonies. Replicants who defy the ban and return to Earth are hunted down and killed ("retired") by special police operatives known as "Blade Runners". Rated R.

Ancient Futures

December 2 (7 p.m.)

Ancient Futures Ladakh, or 'Little Tibet', lies deep in the Himalayas in northernmost India. Isolated for centuries by high mountain passes, Ladakh was spared the impacts of colonialism and development that erased so much of the planet's cultural diversity. In this Tibetan Buddhist culture, people had created a remarkably successful culture, one based on cooperation and sharing. There was no homelessness, no poverty, and no one went hungry. There was no shortage of resources, no pollution. The status of women was remarkably high (higher than in the west), and relations between the Buddhist majority and the Muslim minority were peaceful and friendly.