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Former Goldwater Recipients & Candidates

Brandon Cook

Brandon Cook, an endorsed candidate for the 2012-2013 Goldwater Scholarship, is an Aerospace Engineering ACCEND Student. ACCEND is UC's Accelerated Engineering Degree Program, which results in students receiving both Master's and Bachelor's in the same 5 year program. Brandon is highly involved on campus, including the following activities: University Honors Program, Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership Honor Society, Hurdler for the UC Men's Track and Field Team, Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity member, UC Rocket Club, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society. Brandon has completed internships and co-op experiences at both GE Aviation and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Brandon plans to obtain a PhD in the area of intelligent systems, work for NASA in the area of autonomous robotics, and become an astronaut.

Cameron Ingram

Cameron Ingram, an endorsed candidate for both the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 Goldwater Scholarship, is pursuing a bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering. His field of specialization is Tissue Engineering and regeneration. After his graduation, he plans to pursue a combined MD/PhD in Biomedical Engineering in order to gain a deep understanding of both the medical and clinical environment and establish an important perspective in order to successfully conduct research to develop therapies that treat debilitating diseases. His career goal is to conduct research in engineering successful cell and tissue therapies to treat patients and teach at a university.

Bradley Theilman, Goldwater Scholar 2012

Bradley Theilman, a double major in biomedical engineering and mathematics and a member of the University Honors Program, received the 2012 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. The Goldwater Scholarship is awarded to sophomores and juniors who intend to pursue research-oriented careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering. Brad intends to pursue a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics or Computational Neuroscience and conduct research on information processing in biological neural networks. His goal is to research the mechanisms of neural communication and use this research to construct models and devices which can emulate neural systems or communicate with the nervous system. Brad has taken part in undergraduate research in UC's Nanobiological Systems Laboratory, the HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, and currently at UC's Complex Adaptive Systems Laboratory. He has presented research on stimulated insulin release at the UC Undergraduate Research Poster Session, the Cincinnati Diabetes and Obesity Center Annual Research Symposium, and the Biophysical Society Annual Meeting in San Diego. He has published research in the Journal of Virology as second author on a study characterizing the phi29 bacteriophage DNA packaging motor.