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UC Research Finds Better Ways to Get Engines Revving


Four UC research presentations will be given at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Gas Turbine Institute’s upcoming Turbo Expo.

Date: 5/28/2013 7:37:00 AM
By: Tom Robinette
Phone: (513) 556-1825
Photos By: Image provided by Ephraim Gutmark

UC ingot   The University of Cincinnati is helping develop new ways to make various types of engines cleaner, quieter, more efficient or more powerful through advanced research and better engineering.

Four UC research presentations will be given at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Gas Turbine Institute’s Turbo Expo, held June 3-7 in San Antonio. The 58th annual event unites leading experts in the turbomachinery industry to share the latest innovations.
ported-shroud-turbocharger-graph
A UC research team led by Ephraim Gutmark uses advanced diagnostics to map a turbocharged engine’s surge cycle aerodynamics.


Here are the College of Engineering & Applied Science researchers and their presentations that will be given at Turbo Expo:

“Experimental Investigation of Flow Instability in a Turbocharger Ported Shroud Compressor”
Doctoral student Matthieu Gancedo, Ohio Regents Eminent Scholar Chaired Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Ephraim Gutmark and an industry partner studied how a special type of turbocharger can make smaller engines more powerful and efficient.

“Response of Liquid Jet to Modulated Crossflow”
Post-doctoral scholar Jinkwan Song, graduate student Chandrasekar Ramasubramanian and Ohio Research Scholar Jongguen Lee analyzed the fuel-injection process of air-breathing jet engine systems to help determine ways to improve engine efficiency and reduce fuel requirements.

“Medium Pressure Emissions of a Multi-Point Low NOx Combustion System”

Doctoral students Brian Dolan, David Munday and Rodrigo Villalva; Gutmark; and industry partners worked to develop a more efficient jet engine that produces fewer emissions.

“Near- and Far-Field Pressure Skewness and Kurtosis in Heated Supersonic Jets from Round and Chevron Nozzles”
Doctoral students Pablo Mora and Nick Heeb; assistant research professor Jeff Kastner; Gutmark; and a U.S. Navy research partner explored how to reduce the intense noise of supersonic jets without reducing their power. An earlier version of this research was presented at INTER-NOISE 2012, the 41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, in New York City.