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Law School Lecture Highlights Voting Rights and Political Participation


The UC College of Law will host Professor Garrett Epps, University of Baltimore School of Law, who will discuss the importance of voting rights and political participation. The event will be held on Monday, April 14, 2014, at 12:15 p.m. in Room 114 at the College of Law.  Later that afternoon at 4:30 p.m., Professor Epps and UC Law’s Professor Ann Hubbard will discuss how conservative constitutional theories of law affect communities of color. These events are free. All are invited to attend both.

Date: 4/8/2014 4:00:00 PM
By: Sherry English
Phone: (513) 556-0060

UC ingot   The recent Supreme Court ruling striking down parts of the Voting Rights Act and the introduction of new voter identification laws on the state level has brought the issue of voting rights to the forefront of public discourse. 

Whether liberal or conservative, all individuals are affected by recent events. What does it mean? Professor Garrett Epps, University of Baltimore School of Law, will discuss the importance of voting rights and political participation, as well as highlights from his recent book, Wrong and Dangerous: 10 Popular Myths of Conservative Constitutional Interpretation, on Monday, April 14, 2014, at 12:15 p.m. in Room 114 at the College of Law. 

Below are details for a second free event to continue the conversation.

Dialogue: Conservative Constitutional Jurisprudence and Minorities
Time: 4:30 p.m. on April 14
Location: Crow’s Nest (3rd floor)
Professor Epps and UC Law’s Professor Ann Hubbard will discuss how conservative constitutional theories of law negatively affect communities of color and other minority populations.  

About Professor Epps
Garrett Epps, a former reporter for The Washington Post, is a novelist and legal scholar. A professor of law at the University of Baltimore School of Law, he teaches courses in constitutional law and creative writing for law students. He is also a correspondent for The Atlantic.com. Professor Epps has published numerous books, scholarly articles and articles for general audiences in the fields of constitutional law and civil rights. His most recent books are American Epic: Reading the Constitution, Peyote vs. the State: Religious Freedom on Trial, Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post-Civil War America, and Wrong and Dangerous: Ten Right-Wing Myths About Our Constitution. Democracy Reborn was a finalist for the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award. This former journalist has also written for inter alia, The New York Times, The New Republic, and The New York Review of Books.

This event is brought to the College of Law by the American Constitution Society.