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UC Board Approves Funding for Shared IT Services Agreement with the State of Ohio Computer Center


The UC Board of Trustees approved the funding to establish a shared IT services agreement with the State of Ohio Computer Center. This partnership provides the physical foundation for secure, reliable backups of mission-critical university data over the lightning-fast 100 Gbps statewide broadband Internet backbone.

Date: 8/26/2014 1:00:00 PM
By: Emily Baute
Phone: (513) 556-4519
Other Contact: Dama Ewbank
Other Contact Phone: (513) 558-4519

UC ingot   The UC Board of Trustees today approved the $5 million necessary to formalize the university’s partnership with the State of Ohio Computer Center (SOCC). The partnership provides UC a cost effective and secure site to host university data and provide business continuity. The associated project brings the power of state and national 100 Giga bits per second (Gbps) high-speed networks to the university.

Building the Resource Base
With the SOCC, the university’s core information systems—such as UC Flex (finance and human resources system) and, once fully implemented, Catalyst (the new student information system powered by Oracle PeopleSoft Campus Solutions)—can be up-and-running in less than a day should the university’s local Data Center experience a major outage.

The University of Cincinnati is the first higher education institution in the state to partner with the SOCC as its site for business continuity and disaster recovery.

“The SOCC agreement serves the university’s Third Century vision to ‘build the resource base’ through state partnerships by providing these services at half the price of the national average,” said Nelson Vincent, UC vice president for information technology and chief information officer. “It’s another way we are truly ‘Cincinnati Smart.’”

Leveraging Research
Once finalized, the UC-SOCC project will also function to connect the university to the state and national 100 Gbps high-speed networks to assure the speedy transfer of data from UC core systems to the SOCC.

Connection to the state’s 100 Gpbs network also has strong implications for areas of focus identified through UC’s Third Century planning, which will drive the university’s efforts in cluster hiring. These focus areas include analytics, environment, health, manufacturing and sensing.

In the area of health, for example, high-speed connectivity to Ohio’s other academic medical centers will facilitate the state’s efforts to build a “medical corridor,” linking Cincinnati, Columbus and Cleveland for easier collaboration on research and multi-center clinical trials, data sharing and entrepreneurial activity.

A recently awarded NSF Campus Cyberinfrastructure—Infrastructure, Innovation and Engineering program (CC*IIE) grant will further harness the power of the 100 Gbps connection by anchoring UCScienceNet, a dedicated high-speed network for researchers.

“The SOCC initiative makes lightning-fast data transmission possible for UC’s core business IT systems and for campus researchers. It will allow researchers to make the most of this incredible resource by meeting their increasing demand for data transfer capacity,” said William Ball, MD, UC vice president for research. “This is one example of how IT-enabled partnerships can help leverage UC’s research programs and enhance opportunities to promote commercialization and job growth.”