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Partnership, Potential at Metallomics Center

Doug Richardson came to University of Cincinnati's Chemistry department in time to benefit from an exciting new partnership and in time to help other students realize the enormous potential, and impact, of The University of Cincinnati/Agilent Technologies Metallomics Center of the Americas.

Date: 2/14/2007
By: Britt Kennerly
Phone: (513) 556-8577
Doug Richardson came to University of Cincinnati's Chemistry department in time to benefit from an exciting new partnership and in time to help other students realize the enormous potential, and impact, of The University of Cincinnati/Agilent Technologies Metallomics Center of the Americas.

From students and faculty to the community and beyond, Richardson said, benefits are plentiful through the partnership of UC and Agilent Technologies.

Four years ago, Richardson graduated from Ohio University with a bachelor's of science degree in forensic chemistry.

Richardson

Doug Richardson, pictured in The University of Cincinnati/Agilent Technologies Metallomics Center of the Americas, is set to earn his PhD in Chemistry in June.

A member of Joe Caruso's research group, he's on track to receive his PhD in chemistry in June. Richardson's dissertation research focuses on new method development for chemical warfare agent detection. State of the art technology provided by Agilent, he said, makes a huge difference in his time in the lab, where he works directly with younger and newer students.

"Metallomics is a new and exciting research field covering many different scientific disciplines," Richardson said.

"The impact of research in this field ranges from development of a rapid tool for chemical warfare agent detection as well as a diagnostic method for detecting early signs of disease and/or treatment and prevention tools."

As a student and as a scientist, Richardson sees much to gain from the partnership of the academic and business worlds, and the community at large.

Lokits

Chemistry doctoral student Kirk Lokits explains Agilent-supplied technology to Cynthia Berryman-Fink, interm dean of McMicken College of Arts and Sciences.

"Many companies in the scientific industry preach of innovation; however, many of these companies define this word differently," he said.

"In my opinion innovation is the process of combining developed resources in a new manner for the common goal of scientific advancement. By partnering with academic institutions the potential for innovation is much greater."

He remains a fan of the man who helped spearhead the drive to establish the Center chemistry professor and center director Joe Caruso.

"The greatest inspiration in my time in the lab at UC has been Dr. Caruso," Richardson said. "His willingness to take risks as well as deal with scientific setbacks and breakthroughs is a characteristic that I plan to model my career after. Dr. Caruso has not only been a wonderful academic adviser but also a great friend."

Learn more about the partnership of UC and Agilent Technologies.

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