Preparing and Sustaining Nursing Professionals

Recorded five-minute presentations for the Undergraduate Scholarly Showcase in Category E: New Preparing and Sustaining Nursing Professionals, Projects E-01 through E-50.

Reviewers: Link to Evaluation Form


E-01: Discharge Education Impacting Pediatric Asthma Readmission Rates

Ryan Crow, Nursing
Shelby Tommer, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Lori Seta
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The readmission rates among pediatric patients diagnosed with asthma are brought into question when analyzing the effectiveness of discharge education for both the healthcare team and the caregivers of these patients. Previous research suggested that there is a direct correlation between  knowledge deficits regarding caring for an asthmatic and increased readmission rates for asthematic patients. It was suggested that the fundamental understanding of asthma education among nursing staff and patient families has the potential to decrease readmission rates within this population. Studies that further explored reasons behind increased readmissions of pediatric asthma patients supported this. The current discharge education used at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Liberty Campus Current is provided by the registered respiratory therapists rather than by the registered nurses. The information found in previous studies and current practice both assisted in creating educational content regarding asthmatics that needed to be addressed with nursing staff. Findings of this study have yet to be concluded. To obtain these results and its effectiveness of educating nursing staff about prevention tactics to reduce the rate of readmissions among pediatric asthmatics, we will provide a survey to the registered nurses prior to and following an education session. A post-education reference card will then be provided to the staff to utilize in the future when discharging their asthematic  patients. Objectives that will be addressed are common asthma triggers, identification of common reasons for readmission of asthma patients, and the steps taken in treating an acute asthma attack.


E-02: Beyond the Blues (Group 1)

Natalie Obert, Nursing
Kaitlyn Snow, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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Postpartum depression is depression that occurs after childbirth, resulting in symptoms such as lack of interest in caring for and bonding with the baby, thoughts of self harming, a feeling of sadness or emotionlessness for more than two weeks after birth, and many more. Nationally, about 1 in 8 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression. In the United States, about 1 in 7 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression within the first year after giving birth, but many go undiagnosed. Some studies show that up to 50% of postpartum women with postpartum depression are undiagnosed. The purpose of our educational project is to train postpartum nurses in the hospital setting about the implementation and evaluation of using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to detect early signs and symptoms of postpartum depression disorder and have the ability to continue to use the EPDS on each patient after birth. We conducted an educational powerpoint preceded by a pretest assessment and followed by a posttest assessment of knowledge. It included information of early signs of PPD, general information of the EPDS, how to implement the EPDS, and how to analyze the results gathered by using the EPDS.


E-03: Beyond the Blues (Group 2)

Kendall Sabatelli, Nursing
Dana Buttree, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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Postpartum depression is depression that occurs after childbirth, resulting in symptoms such as lack of interest in caring for and bonding with the baby, thoughts of self-harming, a feeling of sadness or emotionlessness for more than two weeks after birth, and many more. Nationally, about 1 in 8 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression. In the United States, about 1 in 7 women experience symptoms of postpartum depression within the first year after giving birth, but many go undiagnosed. Some studies show that up to 50% of postpartum women with postpartum depression are undiagnosed. The purpose of our educational project is to train postpartum nurses in the hospital setting about the implementation and evaluation of using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to detect early signs and symptoms of postpartum depression disorder and have the ability to continue to use the EPDS on each patient after birth. We conducted an educational PowerPoint preceded by a pretest assessment and followed by a posttest assessment of knowledge. It included information on early signs of PPD, general information of the EPDS, how to implement the EPDS, and how to analyze the results gathered by using the EPDS.


E-04: Coping Mechanisms for Stress and Anxiety in Undergraduate Nursing Students (Group 2)

Andrew Boys, Nursing
Ryan Denoma, Nursing
Anna  Koniecyznski, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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The intensity and rigor of nursing school has been reported to cause 30.2% of students high levels of anxiety and 82.4% moderate stress. The purpose of our educational project is to teach first year undergraduate nursing students coping strategies to manage their stress and anxiety related to nursing school. We will present a fifteen-minute educational session on stress and anxiety through a powerpoint presentation, video, handout, and pre/ post surveys to assess the effectiveness of our teaching. This will include teachings about various coping mechanisms, positive and negative means of coping, and how these strategies can be utilized by nursing students. Findings and conclusions of this study will be determined based upon our educational session.


E-05: Coping Mechanisms for Stress and Anxiety in Undergraduate Nursing Students (Group 1)

Samantha Erny, Nursing
Zoe McIntosh, Nursing
Molly Pierce, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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The intensity and rigor of nursing school has been reported to cause 30.2% of students high levels of anxiety and 82.4% moderate stress. The purpose of our educational project is to teach first year undergraduate nursing students coping strategies to manage their stress and anxiety related to nursing school. We will present a fifteen-minute educational session on stress and anxiety through a powerpoint presentation, video, handout, and pre/ post surveys to assess the effectiveness of our teaching. This will include teachings about various coping mechanisms, positive and negative means of coping, and how these strategies can be utilized by nursing students. Findings and conclusions of this study will be determined based upon our educational session.


E-06: Do Nursing Students REALLY Know Pain Management? (Group 1)

Ashley Kreusch, Nursing
Madeline Okuley, Nursing
Chandler Blum, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Angela Clark
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In 2017, the CDC reported that opioids were responsible for over 40,000 deaths. Thirty-seven percent of these deaths reported were from opioids prescribed by health care providers. The purpose of our project is to educate nursing students on the risk of opioid abuse and alternative pain management strategies. Our project aims to increase future nurses' comfort level in discussing pain management topics with patients and decrease opioid abuse. We will conduct a 15-minute education session with a powerpoint presentation about proper opioid use and alternative pain management. There will be a pre- and post-survey that will assess nursing student knowledge on opioids and their comfort levels about communicating with patients regarding pain management. Results are pending.


E-07: Do Nursing Students REALLY Know Pain Management? (Group 2)

Erin Kaiser, Nursing
Kristen Bruggeman, Nursing
Hong Jun Jo, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Angela Clark
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In 2017, the CDC reported that opioids were responsible for over 40,000 deaths. Thirty-seven percent of these deaths reported were from opioids prescribed by health care providers. The purpose of our project is to educate nursing students on the risk of opioid abuse and alternative pain management strategies. Our project aims to increase future nurses' comfort level in discussing pain management topics with patients and decrease opioid abuse. We will conduct a 15-minute education session with a powerpoint presentation about proper opioid use and alternative pain management. There will be a pre- and post-survey that will assess nursing student knowledge on opioids and their comfort levels about communicating with patients regarding pain management. Results are pending.


E-08: Educating Traditional BSN Students on Safe Sleep Practices: Teaching Students How to Teach Parents (Group 1)

Elise Ash, Nursing
Sierra Gostomsky, Nursing
Julia Dawson, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Babies in Hamilton county die from sleep related causes at a rate almost double the national average. The purpose of our educational project is to educate nursing students in Hamilton county about effectively communicating with parents of newborns about safe sleep practices. While safe sleep education is already occurring in most areas, there is a gap between the education and parents accepting and implementing the practices in their family's lives. We created a PowerPoint and video about safe sleep importance and practices and how to better communicate this to parents. We also created a crib audit tool for the students to use to practice identifying safe sleep practices within their clinical setting. We evaluated the students on the effectiveness of our educational project with a pre- and post-survey. Results and conclusion pending.


E-09: Educating Traditional BSN Students on Safe Sleep Practices: Teaching Students How to Teach Parents (Group 2)

Reilly Daniels, Nursing
Grace Mansuetto, Nursing
Emily Kemper, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Babies in Hamilton county die from sleep related causes at a rate almost double the national average. The purpose of our educational project is to educate nursing students in Hamilton county about effectively communicating with parents of newborns about safe sleep practices. While safe sleep education is already occurring in most areas, there is a gap between the education and parents accepting and implementing the practices in their family's lives. We created a PowerPoint and video about safe sleep importance and practices and how to better communicate this to parents. We also created a crib audit tool for the students to use to practice identifying safe sleep practices within their clinical setting. We evaluated the students on the effectiveness of our educational project with a pre- and post-survey. Results and conclusion pending.


E-10: Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students on the Consequences of Shift Work (Group 1)

Musa Atallah, Nursing
Miracle Vandevener, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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All around the world nursing students are put through rigorous programs to help prepare them to become the best nurses they can be. However, many new graduate nurses are hired into different shift positions without being educated on the effects of shift work. The purpose of this project is to educate nursing students on the effects of shift work and help them identify ways to minimize those effects. An educational presentation was created that included the effects of shift work on one's health and work performance, and ways to minimize them. This will be presented to a group of undergraduate freshmen nursing students during one of their learning community courses. We will measure the effectiveness of our presentation by conducting a pre- and post-test. Results and conclusions are pending the delivery of the educational session.


E-11: Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students on the Consequences of Shift Work (Group 2)

Journey Bond, Nursing
Candace Sharp, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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All around the world nursing students are put through rigorous programs to help prepare them to become the best nurses they can be. However, many new graduate nurses are hired into different shift positions without being educated on the effects of shift work. The purpose of this project is to educate nursing students on the effects of shift work and help them identify ways to minimize those effects. An educational presentation was created that included the effects of shift work on one's health and work performance, and ways to minimize them. This will be presented to a group of undergraduate freshmen nursing students during one of their learning community courses. We will measure the effectiveness of our presentation by conducting a pre- and post-test. Results and conclusions are pending the delivery of the educational session.


E-12: Education for Nurses on Preterm Birth Among Black Women (Group 1)

Kirsten Hausmann, Nursing
Megan Nielander, Nursing
Heather Engle, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Lori Trammel
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According to the CDC, in 2019, the rate of preterm birth among African-American women (14.4%) was about 50 percent higher than the rate of preterm birth among white or Hispanic women (9.3% and 10% respectively). It has even been found that racial disparities in preterm birth still persist among women who have high levels of education and socioeconomic status (Johnson, 2020). The purpose of this project is to educate nurses who care for pregnant, laboring, and delivering black women about the health disparity within preterm birth and their role in reducing this disparity. We will conduct a twenty-minute educational session using handouts as well as a pre-test and post-test survey to gauge knowledge acquired during our session. We will explain preterm birth and its warning signs, compare black and white women's preterm birth rates and why they are so different, and explore strategies to improve health outcomes for black women and their babies. Results from our educational session are pending.


E-13: Education for Nurses on Preterm Birth Among Black Women (Group 2)

Madison Balsinger, Nursing
Madison Sloman, Nursing
Katelyn Fenik, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Lori Trammel
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According to the CDC in 2019, the rate of preterm birth among African-American women (14.4%) was about 50 percent higher than the rate of preterm birth among white or Hispanic women (9.3% and 10% respectively). It has even been found that racial disparities in preterm birth still persist among women who have high levels of education and socioeconomic status. The purpose of this project is to educate nurses who care for pregnant, laboring, and delivering black women about the health disparity within preterm birth and their role in reducing this disparity. We will conduct a twenty-minute educational session using handouts as well as a pre-test and post-test survey to gauge knowledge acquired during our session. We will explain preterm birth and its warning signs, compare black and white women's preterm birth rates and why they are so different, and explore strategies to improve health outcomes for black women and their babies. Results from our educational session are pending.


E-14: Education on Ginger and Peppermint as Interventions for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Registered Nurses (Group 1)

Rosanna Bartlett, Nursing
Lillian Restle, Nursing
Sarah Keller, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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In the general post-operative stage, 30% of patients vomit and 50 % of patients have nausea. High risk patients may have an increased risk of up to 70-80% for PONV (Koyuncu, O., Urfali, S., Hakimoglu, S., & Tasdogan, A.M. 2020). There are countless complications of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Such complications include aspiration, suture opening, esophageal rupture, electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, and an extended recovery time. These complications can potentially cause hospital admission of a patient when the surgery itself may not have required one. Current practice proves that finding effective treatments for post-operative nausea and vomiting has been difficult to determine. The purpose of this project is to explore the effectiveness of education in registered nurses on the alternative use of peppermint and ginger to decrease the incidence of PONV. The learning objectives include identifying complications of PONV, ways to incorporate peppermint and ginger into current practice, the contraindications associated with said alternative therapies, and their effects on the body. We provided booklets, pamphlets, and powerpoints as tools to educate the nurses; pre- and post-tests were given to determine their level of knowledge both before and after teaching. Results pending.


E-15: Education on Ginger and Peppermint as Interventions for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Registered Nurses (Group 2)

Elizabeth Carl, Nursing
Kaylee Clemens, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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In the general post-operative stage, 30% of patients vomit and 50% of patients have nausea. High risk patients may have an increased risk of up to 70-80% for PONV (Koyuncu, O., Urfali, S., Hakimoglu, S., & Tasdogan, A.M. 2020). There are countless complications of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Such complications include aspiration, suture opening, esophageal rupture, electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, and an extended recovery time. These complications can potentially cause hospital admission of a patient when the surgery itself may not have required one. Current practice proves that finding effective treatments for post-operative nausea and vomiting has been difficult to determine. The purpose of this project is to explore the effectiveness of education in registered nurses on the alternative use of peppermint and ginger to decrease the incidence of PONV. The learning objectives include identifying complications of PONV,   ways to incorporate peppermint and ginger into current practice, the contraindications associated with said alternative therapies, and their effects on the body. We provided booklets, pamphlets, and powerpoints as tools to educate the nurses; pre- and post-tests were given to determine their level of knowledge both before and after teaching. Results pending. 


E-16: Identifying Coping Mechanisms to Reduce Burnout (Group 1)

Megan Johnson, Nursing
Lauren Turschak, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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High levels of burnout can be seen throughout the medical field, especially psychiatric nursing, due to high stress environments. The purpose of this education session was to educate psychiatric nurses about coping mechanisms to reduce nurse burnout and decrease work stress. A 20 minute presentation involving pre/post-tests was provided to nurses on the target unit. The presentation included information about the rate and signs of burnout within mental health nurses and coping mechanism training to include in their daily practice. Throughout the session, nurses were able to learn how to accurately and efficiently use the coping mechanisms and relaxation techniques. Participants completed a post test after the education session and were able to reach out with questions and comments about the session which showed interest and engagement. Results of the study are pending due to the education plan being scheduled for the 30th of March.


E-17: Identifying Coping Mechanisms to Reduce Burnout (Group 2)

Emily Booth, Nursing
Anna Scully, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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High levels of burnout can be seen throughout the medical field, especially psychiatric nursing, due to high stress environments. The purpose of this education session was to educate psychiatric nurses about coping mechanisms to reduce nurse burnout and decrease work stress. A 20 minute presentation involving pre/post-tests was provided to nurses on the target unit. The presentation included information about the rate and signs of burnout within mental health nurses and coping mechanism training to include in their daily practice. Throughout the session, nurses were able to learn how to accurately and efficiently use the coping mechanisms and relaxation techniques. Participants completed a post test after the education session and were able to reach out with questions and comments about the session which showed interest and engagement. Results of the study are pending due to the education plan being scheduled for the 30th of March.


E-18: Identifying Coping Mechanisms to Reduce Burnout (Group 3)

Kaylie Hooker, Nursing
Bailey Huffman, Nursing
Kayley Evans, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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High levels of burnout can be seen throughout the medical field, especially psychiatric nursing, due to high stress environments. The purpose of this education session was to educate psychiatric nurses about coping mechanisms to reduce nurse burnout and decrease work stress. A 20 minute presentation involving pre/post-tests was provided to nurses on the target unit. The presentation included information about the rate and signs of burnout within mental health nurses and coping mechanism training to include in their daily practice. Throughout the session, nurses were able to learn how to accurately and efficiently use the coping mechanisms and relaxation techniques. Participants completed a post test after the education session and were able to reach out with questions and comments about the session which showed interest and engagement. Results of the study are pending due to the education plan being scheduled for the 30th of March.


E-19: Improvement of Preeclampsia Outcomes Through Effective Management and Treatment (Group 1)

Mariah Cornett, Nursing
Becky Davis, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Preeclampsia is the leading cause of maternal death and illness globally. This disease affects 2-8% of pregnancies worldwide and 15% of premature births in the United States. Although the most effective treatment is the delivery of the baby and placenta, the purpose of our project is to educate obstetric nurses about management of preeclampsia so they can recognize early warning signs, gain knowledge on available treatments, and develop treatment plans. We created an educational powerpoint/video to present to the obstetric nurses, explaining recent preeclampsia research on management and treatment. We provided a pre and post test composed of 6 questions for the nurses to take to assess the knowledge gained. Our findings and conclusion are still pending.


E-20: Improvement of Preeclampsia Outcomes Through Effective Management and Treatment (Group 2)

Brooke O'Toole, Nursing
Abbie Mahlman, Nursing
Kaylie Harris, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Preeclampsia is the leading cause of maternal death and illness globally. This disease affects 2-8% of pregnancies worldwide and 15% of premature births in the United States. Although the most effective treatment is the delivery of the baby and placenta, the purpose of our project is to educate obstetric nurses about management of preeclampsia so they can recognize early warning signs, gain knowledge on available treatments, and develop treatment plans. We created an educational powerpoint/video to present to the obstetric nurses, explaining recent preeclampsia research on management and treatment. We provided a pre and post test composed of 6 questions for the nurses to take to assess the knowledge gained. Our findings and conclusion are still pending.


E-21: Improving Care Strategies for Substance Abuse in Pregnant Women (Group 1)

Paige Bennett, Nursing
Nicholas VanSant, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Nationwide, the United States has seen a drastic increase in opioid use in pregnancy from roughly 1.5 cases every 1000 deliveries to an astounding 6.5.  Since 1999, the number of women using opioids during pregnancy has risen by 4 times and is currently the highest it's ever been.  In addition, according to the CDC, there has been a 2.1% increase of alcohol use among pregnant women from 2011 to 2018 which poses a major risk among pregnant women and their children in the US. The purpose of our project is to teach nurses who care for pregnant women at risk for substance abuse effective care strategies that encapsulate the entire woman through women-centered services as well as inform them of women-centered resources found in the local community.  Through extensive research, we have gathered information on how women-centered care can better treat pregnant women who are addicted to drugs during their pregnancy. We will be conducting a fifteen-minute PowerPoint to present to nurses who care for this specific population, followed by giving handouts that provide effective care strategies and local resources.  We will provide both a pre and post tests to measure how effective the educational presentation was and whether or not the special points were retained.  While we gather our research, our conclusion is still in progress.


E-22: Improving Care Strategies for Substance Abuse in Pregnant Women (Group 2)

Alyssa Amato, Nursing
Lindsey Rich, Nursing
Anna Hamilton, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Angel Cook
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Nationwide, the United States has seen a drastic increase in opioid use in pregnancy from roughly 1.5 cases every 1000 deliveries to an astounding 6.5.  Since 1999, the number of women using opioids during pregnancy has risen by 4 times and is currently the highest it's ever been.  In addition, according to the CDC, there has been a 2.1% increase of alcohol use among pregnant women from 2011 to 2018 which poses a major risk among pregnant women and their children in the US. The purpose of our project is to teach nurses who care for pregnant women at risk for substance abuse effective care strategies that encapsulate the entire woman through women-centered services as well as inform them of women-centered resources found in the local community.  Through extensive research, we have gathered information on how women-centered care can better treat pregnant women who are addicted to drugs during their pregnancy. It is important that we educate OB nurses on the proper screening for substance abuse, how women-centered care can lessen relapse rates, and educate on local resources that can be found closeby. We will be conducting a fifteen minute powerpoint to present to nurses who care for this specific population, followed by giving handouts that provide effective care strategies and local resources.  We will provide both a pre and post tests to measure how effective the educational presentation was and whether or not the special points were retained. While we gather our research, our conclusion is still in progress.


E-23: Improving Nurse Knowledge on the Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (Group 1)

Chloe Salzarulo, Nursing
Dana Collopy, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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 In 2016, it was found that one baby was born every 15 minutes with the diagnosis of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). The prevalence of neonates in the United States with NAS, though plateauing over the years, is still incredibly high and continued action is needed to improve the outcomes of these neonates (VUMC News and Communication, 2020). The purpose of our project was to educate nurses who provide care to neonates experiencing NAS on current non pharmacological nursing interventions. The basis of the education was to improve the knowledge and ability to implement these interventions in the clinical setting. We conducted a 10-15 minute educational session along with a pre and post education survey. The education presentation included statistics on the length of stay for these neonates after undergoing interventions such as: swaddling, skin to skin contact, breast milk feeds, private rooms, or low stimulation environments.

FINDINGS: "Results pending the completion of our education session"

CONCLUSION " ^ "


E-24: Improving Nurse Knowledge on the Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (Group 2)

Kyaia Bacon, Nursing
Sarah Adams, Nursing
Brittany Wall, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Donna Green
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 In 2016, it was found that one baby was born every 15 minutes with the diagnosis of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). The prevalence of neonates in the United States with NAS remains incredibly high and continued action is needed to improve the outcomes of these neonates. The purpose of our project was to educate nurses on current nonpharmacological interventions to aid in the treatment of NAS. The basis of the education was to improve the knowledge and ability to implement these interventions in the clinical setting. We conducted a 10-15 minute educational session along with a pre and post education survey. The education presentation included statistics on the length of stay for these neonates after undergoing interventions such as: swaddling, skin to skin contact, breast milk feeds, private rooms, or low stimulation environments.


E-25: Improving Nurses Knowledge During the Discharge of a Patient with Antibiotics (Group 1)

Nicholas Goldfuss, Nursing
Chad O'Connor, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, 2 million cases of antibiotic resistant bacteria occur every year resulting in the loss of nearly 23,000 lives in the United States alone. (Sumner et al., 2018)  In addition, a recent study found that 60% of the antibiotic treatment duration occurred after the patient was discharged (Hoover, 2017). The purpose of our educational project is to improve medical-surgical nurses' knowledge on the implications of antibiotic therapy in order to increase the quality of discharge education they conduct for patients. We will direct a twenty-minute educational session for a unit of nurses which features a pre- and post-assessment to measure their degree of learning. The module includes information on antibiotic treatment guidelines, side effects, complementary alternative therapies, and long term ramifications of antibiotic usage on patients and the community. After providing the educational module, 82% of nurses who participated had increased their post-assessment score when compared to their pre-assessment score. Additionally, 90% of nurses felt that they were more confident with teaching patients about antibiotics after completing the educational module. The increase in assessment scores and confidence levels indicate that the information presented was new and can help nurses formulate an effective discharge plan for a patient on antibiotics.


E-26: Improving Nurses Knowledge During the Discharge of a Patient with Antibiotics (Group 2)

Thomas Schraivogel, Nursing
Paige Krajicek, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, 2 million cases of antibiotic resistant bacteria occur every year resulting in the loss of nearly 23,000 lives in the United States alone. (Sumner et al., 2018)  In addition, a recent study found that 60% of the antibiotic treatment duration occured after the patient was discharged (Hoover, 2017). The purpose of our educational project is to improve medical-surgical nurses' knowledge on the implications of antibiotic therapy in order to increase the quality of discharge education they conduct for patients. We will direct a twenty-minute educational session for a unit of nurses which features a pre- and post-assessment to measure their degree of learning. The module includes information on antibiotic treatment guidelines, side effects, complementary alternative therapies, and long term ramifications of antibiotic usage on patients and the community. After providing the educational module, 82% of nurses who participated had increased their post-assessment score when compared to their pre-assessment score. Additionally, 90% of nurses felt that they were more confident with teaching patients about antibiotics after completing the educational module. The increase in assessment scores and confidence levels indicate that the information presented was new and can help nurses formulate an effective discharge plan for a patient on antibiotics.


E-27: Improving Nursing Burnout via Education and Prevention (Group 1)

Chase Zearbaugh, Nursing
Allison Mcgarr, Nursing
Sergio Palafox, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Deborah Schwytzer
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Hospital workers have been identified as the group most likely to experience burnout out of all at-risk careers. In fact, a 2011 study found that 34% of hospital nurses report experiencing symptoms of burnout, as opposed to 22% of nurses working in other settings. Research suggests that this number is even higher in the Emergency Department population.  The purpose of our project is to educate nurses in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Emergency Department about coping strategies and methods to prevent burnout. We conducted a twenty minute educational session paired with a pamphlet and a post education survey. The educational session included information on why burnout happens, how to prevent burnout, coping strategies to deal with burnout, and resources for the nurses to utilize when thinking about burnout in their workplace.


E-28: Improving Nursing Burnout via Education and Prevention (Group 2)

Alyssa Wiedemann, Nursing
Samantha Drago, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Hospital workers have been identified as the group most likely to experience burnout out of all at-risk careers. In fact, a 2011 study found that 34% of hospital nurses report experiencing symptoms of burnout, as opposed to 22% of nurses working in other settings. Research suggests that this number is even higher in the Emergency Department population.  The purpose of our project is to educate nurses in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Emergency Department about coping strategies and methods to prevent burnout. We conducted a twenty minute educational session paired with a pamphlet and a post education survey. The educational session included information on why burnout happens, how to prevent burnout, coping strategies to deal with burnout, and resources for the nurses to utilize when thinking about burnout in their workplace.


E-29: Improving Pediatric Registered Nurses Knowledge on Coping Skills and Available Resources Surrounding the Loss of a Patient (Group 1)

Angela Vega, Nursing
Hannah Willeke, Nursing
Ally Douglas, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Jeanine Goodin
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Registered nurses often feel unprepared to care for both patients who are nearing the end of their life, and their families who are grieving alongside them. According to BMC Palliative Care, in a descriptive study with a total of 1,310 of nurses from a variety of units, "92% of nurses expressed concerns about providing end of life care and it was particularly difficult to help patients express their anger and concern regarding death". Nurses can also feel unsupported in the realm of available resources and support systems when providing end of life care. The aim of this project is to educate pediatric registered nurses on the continuous education and training that nurses should receive on end of life care and communication with patients and families, as well as resources and coping skills in which to utilize to reduce negative effects from the loss on their well-being. A group of selected pediatric nurses at Cincinnati Children's Hospital received an educational PowerPoint with the material at hand. A pre and post-test were administered to allow for the analysis of their knowledge gained after viewing the educational PowerPoint. Also included in the PowerPoint presentation is resources specific to Cincinnati Children's Hospital to provide a direct link to resources for registered nurses, and other staff members, to consult for help and support in end of life care. *insert results* *conclusion pending*


E-30: Improving Pediatric Registered Nurses Knowledge on Coping Skills and Available Resources Surrounding the Loss of a Patient (Group 2)

Corinne Schuermann, Nursing
Bailey Baker, Nursing
Hailey Fox, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Jeanine Goodin
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Pediatric registered nurses are not properly prepared for the stressors that are associated with the loss of a patient. Adequate knowledge surrounding effective ways to reduce these stressors can minimize the negative effects associated with the loss of a patient.

The goal of this intervention is to increase pediatric registered nurses' knowledge on proper coping mechanisms, education, training, and resources that minimize the negative effects surrounding the loss of a patient. A group of pediatric registered nurses at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center will receive a pre-test, an educational PowerPoint, and a post-test. The pre and post-test are to be completed before and after viewing the PowerPoint. The PowerPoint includes both the negative effects on nurses related to the loss of a patient and the proper coping mechanisms, education, training, and resources that are effective in minimizing these negative effects. The test answers were used to analyze the knowledge gained and overall effectiveness of the education.

After viewing the educational PowerPoint, nurses were able to identify effective coping mechanisms and resources. Many also reported that prior to this education they had received little to no education or training surrounding this information. All nurses involved stated that the educational PowerPoint was effective and having this new knowledge would help them in their future practice. Furthermore, educating pediatric registered nurses on the proper resources, training, coping mechanisms, and education can reduce the negative effects associated with the loss of a patient.


E-31: Improving Undergraduate Nursing Student Knowledge on Early Recognition of Pediatric Sepsis (Group 1)

Erica Evans, Nursing
Anna Carson, Nursing
Rebecca Wilson, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Tamara Brockman
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Background: Sepsis is a life threatening condition and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for the pediatric population in the world. Outcomes of sepsis are highly dependent upon time and therefore early recognition is essential for the effectiveness of treatment and achievement of positive outcomes.

Purpose: The purpose of this educational project is to educate nursing students in their pediatric class about sepsis in the pediatric population in order to increase their knowledge as they head into clinical settings.

Methods: An educational PowerPoint was created to present to an undergraduate pediatric nursing class in which the causes, signs and symptoms, and importance of early recognition of sepsis in pediatric patients are discussed. The incorporation of videos, interactive learning activities, pictures/diagrams, and sepsis protocol tools from multiple hospitals are used to accommodate the different learning styles of students. A pre- and post- test will be administered to the class in order to measure the effectiveness of the educational intervention.

Results and conclusions for the educational plan and study are pending.


E-32: Improving Undergraduate Nursing Student Knowledge on Early Recognition of Pediatric Sepsis (Group 2)

Hope Whiteside, Nursing
Molly Bunnell, Nursing
Jenna Wright, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Tamara Brockman
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Sepsis is a life threatening condition and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for the pediatric population in the world. Outcomes of sepsis are highly dependent upon time and therefore early recognition is essential for the effectiveness of treatment and achievement of positive outcomes.

Purpose: The purpose of this educational project is to educate nursing students in their pediatric class about sepsis in the pediatric population in order to increase their knowledge as they head into clinical settings.

Methods: An educational PowerPoint was created to present to an undergraduate pediatric nursing class in which the causes, signs and symptoms, and importance of early recognition of sepsis in pediatric patients are discussed. The incorporation of videos, interactive learning activities, pictures/diagrams, and sepsis protocol tools from multiple hospitals are used to accommodate the different learning styles of students. A pre- and post- test will be administered to the class in order to measure the effectiveness of the educational intervention.

Results and conclusions for the educational plan and study are pending.


E-33: Increasing NICU Nurses' Knowledge on Early-Start Breastfeeding at the Bedside (Group 1)

Sierra Stepp, Nursing
Kamryn Buckman, Nursing
Ashley Huddleson, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Othman Mohammad
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Breastfeeding educational interventions have been shown to improve Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)  nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, thereby fostering a more supportive atmosphere for lactation. The purpose of this research is to increase NICU nurses' knowledge about early-start breastfeeding for infants considered preterm in a level III academic health NICU. A twenty minute education session will be conducted with a goal of improving nurses' knowledge on early-initiation breastfeeding using a powerpoint presentation through Webex. A pretest/posttest design is being used to gather data on the effectiveness of the educational intervention. The intervention is aimed to inform nurses about current evidence based practices for early-start breastfeeding and what their role is in implementing these practices at the bedside. The objective, post-delivery, is to improve nurses' knowledge about implementing early-start breastfeeding and ways to utilize the baby friendly hospital initiative in day to day practice at the bedside. Pending results, an educational intervention in the neonatal intensive care unit is intended to be a successful and valuable method for NICUs operating under evidence based practice in order to increase early-start breastfeeding at the bedside.


E-34: Increasing NICU Nurses' Knowledge on Early-Start Breastfeeding at the Bedside (Group 2)

Emily Yursky, Nursing
Kennedy Wracher, Nursing
Lydia Powell, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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Breastfeeding educational interventions have been shown to improve Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)  nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, thereby fostering a more supportive atmosphere for lactation. The purpose of this research is to increase NICU nurses' knowledge about early-start breastfeeding for infants considered preterm in a level III academic health NICU. A twenty minute education session will be conducted with a goal of improving nurses' knowledge on early-initiation breastfeeding using a powerpoint presentation through Webex. A pretest/posttest design is being used to gather data on the effectiveness of the educational intervention. The intervention is aimed to inform nurses about current evidence based practices for early-start breastfeeding and what their role is in implementing these practices at the bedside. The objective, post-delivery, is to improve nurses' knowledge about implementing early-start breastfeeding and ways to utilize the baby friendly hospital initiative in day to day practice at the bedside. Pending results, an educational intervention in the neonatal intensive care unit is intended to be a successful and valuable method for NICUs operating under evidence based practice in order to increase early-start breastfeeding at the bedside.


E-35: Myth-Busting the Baby Blues (Group 1)

Alexis Matala, Nursing
Madison Lentz, Nursing
Olivia Hazel, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Postpartum depression is one of the most common postpartum complications, occurring in 1 out of 8 postpartum women. It is associated with serious adverse outcomes for both the mother and the child and is more likely to worsen without treatment. Multiple screenings enable early identification and treatment of postpartum depression which is imperative to prevent postpartum depression from worsening and to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this project is to teach nurses the benefits of multiple screenings for PPD and how multiple screenings are associated with improved patient outcomes. An education session was conducted, paired with a pamphlet and a post-learning questionnaire to nursing staff on the labor and delivery and mother-baby units. Upon completion of this project, the results will be reported.


E-36: Myth-Busting the Baby Blues (Group 2)

Amanda Evans, Nursing
Madison Duhl, Nursing
Mazie Kastner, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Amber Irwin
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Postpartum depression is one of the most common postpartum complications, occurring in 1 out of 8 postpartum women. It is associated with serious adverse outcomes for both the mother and the child and is more likely to worsen without treatment. Multiple screenings enable early identification and treatment of postpartum depression which is imperative to prevent postpartum depression from worsening and to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this project is to teach nurses the benefits of multiple screenings for PPD and how multiple screenings are associated with improved patient outcomes. An education session was conducted, paired with a pamphlet and a post-learning questionnaire to nursing staff on the labor and delivery and mother-baby units. Upon completion of this project, the results will be reported.


E-37: The Pressure is Off: Improving Assessment Skills of Pressure Injuries (Group 1)

Jenna Wamack, Nursing
Grace Combs, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Jeanine Goodin
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Pressure injury occurrence developed in patients during hospitalization can increase length of stay and negatively impact health outcomes. A recent study done in 150 Korean hospitals found that the mortality rate in patients with pressure injuries was 2.81 times higher and the length of hospital stay in patients with a pressure injury was prolonged for 15.8 days on average compared with patients without a pressure injury. Based on the accumulation of current research on nurses caring for patients with pressure injuries, this project has created an educational presentation and tool (badge reel card) to assist in the improvement of knowledge of nurses on progressive care unit at Mercy Fairfield in an effort to improve their confidence of pressure injury assessment and following treatment plans designed by wound care teams. An educational PowerPoint was delivered to nurses on the PCU via email, along with a pre and post-test to assess prior and post knowledge, and a visual of the badge reel card created by our group. The results showed a 20% increase of nurses stating they felt more confident after receiving this education about the care and treatment of patients with pressure injury. There was 30% increase in overall confidence in the ability to identify different characteristics of pressure injuries. After providing the educational session, the nurses on this unit showed an overall increase in knowledge and confidence in the assessment of pressure injuries, as well as finding the badge reel helpful.


E-38: The Pressure is Off: Improving Assessment Skills of Pressure Injuries (Group 2)

Chloe Schwartz, Nursing
Romie Suer, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Jeanine Goodin
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Pressure injury occurrence developed in patients during hospitalization can increase length of stay and negatively impact health outcomes. A recent study done in 150 Korean hospitals found that the mortality rate in patients with pressure injuries was 2.81 times higher and the length of hospital stay in patients with a pressure injury was prolonged for 15.8 days on average compared with patients without a pressure injury. Based on the accumulation of current research on nurses caring for patients with pressure injuries, this project has created an educational presentation and tool (badge reel card) to assist in the improvement of knowledge of nurses on progressive care unit at Mercy Fairfield in an effort to improve their confidence of pressure injury assessment and following treatment plans designed by wound care teams. An educational PowerPoint was delivered to nurses on the PCU via email, along with a pre and post-test to assess prior and post knowledge, and a visual of the badge reel card created by our group. The results showed a 20% increase of nurses stating they felt more confident after receiving this education about the care and treatment of patients with pressure injury. There was 30% increase in overall confidence in the ability to identify different characteristics of pressure injuries. After providing the educational session, the nurses on this unit showed an overall increase in knowledge and confidence in the assessment of pressure injuries, as well as finding the badge reel helpful.


E-39: The Role of Nursing Assessment in Decreasing Maternal Mortality and Severe Maternal Morbidity: Educating Third Year Nursing Students (Group 1)

Emily Hannan, Nursing
Alexa Cline, Nursing
Madison Ross, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Donna Green
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In the United States, over 700 women die each year from problems related to pregnancy or delivery; and two-thirds of these deaths are preventable. Additionally, each year tens of thousands of women suffer from preventable peripartum-related health problems and complications that can cause long-lasting health consequences. Particularly in the postpartum period, women on the peripartum continuum are encountered in all areas of nursing care. In these patients, peripartum status is often not properly recognized or addressed, leading to cardinal signs and symptoms of life-threatening complications being missed. The purpose of our educational project was to train University of Cincinnati Junior nursing students on peripartum risk factors that are critical to collect in an acute point-of-care encounter in any specialty setting. We created a ten-minute educational presentation including a slideshow and relevant videos to educate the group on the definitions and common causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States, populations most at risk, and assessment points that are critical to collect in an emergency situation. We utilized scored pre and post-session tests to measure the degree of understanding that our education provided, our results are still pending.


E-40: The Role of Nursing Assessment in Decreasing Maternal Mortality and Severe Maternal Morbidity: Educating Third Year Nursing Students (Group 2)

Olivia Lusby, Nursing
Abby Oswald, Nursing
Brandy Kelly, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Donna Green
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In the United States, over 700 women die each year from problems related to pregnancy or delivery; and two-thirds of these deaths are preventable. Each year tens of thousands of women suffer from preventable peripartum-related health problems and complications that can cause long-lasting health consequences. Additionally, peripartum status is often not properly recognized or addressed, leading to cardinal signs and symptoms of life-threatening complications being missed. The purpose of our educational project was to train University of Cincinnati Junior nursing students on peripartum risk factors that are critical to assess in an acute point-of-care encounter in any specialty setting. We created a ten-minute educational presentation and relevant videos to educate the students on the definitions and common causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States, populations most at risk, and assessment points that are critical to collect in an emergency situation. We utilized scored pre and post-session tests to measure the degree of understanding that our education provided, our results are still pending.


E-41: Transitioning from Student to Nurse (Group 1)

Hailey Young, Nursing
Kyle Macgowan, Nursing
Zachary Militello, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Jean Heiskell
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The transition of nurses from school into the profession is stressful. In fact research has shown that nursing students who have completed a residency program feel 73% more comfortable in their role a nurse. The purpose of our project was to inform new graduate nurses on the different types of transition programs, including role transition, residency, and mentorship, to increase their knowledge and confidence when selecting a future workplace. We plan to present an educational session to include insight of the stress in graduating and transitioning to a registered nurse, the importance of each program, including the purpose, benefits, and requirements for each, and points to ensure in a future workplaces offering program. After providing the educational program, we expect that all participants will have a better understanding of transition programs and be able to identify the benefits and differences between these programs.


E-42: Transitioning from Student to Nurse (Group 2)

Allison Colburn, Nursing
Sabrina Bernardo, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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The transition of new graduate nurses from school to the profession is stressful. With the help of transition programs, research has shown that 73% of new graduate nurses who completed a residency program reported feeling more comfortable in their role as  nurse. The purpose of our project was to inform new graduate nurses on the different types of transition programs, including role transition, residency, and mentorship, to increase their knowledge and confidence when selecting a future workplace. We plan to present an educational session to include insight of the stress in graduating and transitioning to a registered nurse, the importance of each program, including the purpose, benefits, and requirements for each, and points to ensure in a future workplaces offering program. After providing the educational program, we expect that all participants will have a better understanding of transition programs and be able to identify the benefits and differences between these programs.


E-43: Transitioning from Student to Registered Nurse (Group 1)

Rachel Hatcher, Nursing
Megan Sanders, Nursing
Erin Cronan, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Lori Catalano
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Transitioning from a nursing student to a registered nurse is a stressful and challenging process. Hospitals have implemented nurse residency programs and orientation programs to help the transition during the first year of employment. Less attention has been paid to pre-graduation programs and what can be done to help facilitate this transition prior to graduation. The purpose of our project is to educate second-year nursing students on the benefits of pre-graduation hospital employment, such as patient-care assistant (PCA) and Co-Op positions, when transitioning from a student to a registered nurse.  An educational PowerPoint in a lecture format was created to present to second-year nursing students. Our presentation included: the roles and benefits of PCA and Co-Op positions, the various differences between hospital employment and clinical, and research that supports our educational findings. The second-year nursing students were given a pre- and post-lecture survey to measure their overall willingness to seek hospital employment prior to graduation. Of the second-year nursing students that completed the pre- and post-survey, there was an 8% increase in student willingness to seek out hospital employment prior to graduation. The increase in willingness shown by the students indicates that this was new and vital information.


E-44: Transitioning from Student to Registered Nurse (Group 2)

Emma Sopko, Nursing
Camryn Hill, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Lori Catalano
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Transitioning from a nursing student to a registered nurse is a stressful and challenging process. Hospitals have implemented nurse residency programs and orientation programs to help the transition during the first year of employment. Less attention has been paid to pre-graduation programs and what can be done to help facilitate this transition prior to graduation. The purpose of our project is to educate second-year nursing students on the benefits of pre-graduation hospital employment, such as patient-care assistant (PCA) and Co-Op positions, when transitioning from a student to a registered nurse.  An educational PowerPoint in a lecture format was created to present to second-year nursing students. Our presentation included: the roles and benefits of PCA and Co-Op positions, the various differences between hospital employment and clinical, and research that supports our educational findings. The second-year nursing students were given a pre- and post-lecture survey to measure their overall willingness to seek hospital employment prior to graduation. Of the second-year nursing students that completed the pre- and post-survey, there was an 8% increase in student willingness to seek out hospital employment prior to graduation. The increase in willingness shown by the students indicates that this was new and vital information.


E-45: Treatment of Substance Use Disorders without Judgement (Group 1)

Ebba Ribbing, Nursing
Mackenzie Robinette, Nursing
Tina Rozman, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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Background: Currently, nursing professionals report feeling uncomfortable providing care to patients with substance use disorder due to a lack of education in the needs of this population.

Purpose: This project works to improve the comfort level of undergraduate nursing students in assessing, caring for, and referring patients with substance use disorder to treatment. In order to achieve this, undergraduate nursing students will be educated on the use of SBIRT, meaning Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment. This tool is used as a public health intervention to identify health risks, increase communication and coordination of care for patients with substance use disorder.

Method: A virtual teaching session that included an educational video and PowerPoint on this population and SBIRT usage was provided. A pretest and posttest were administered to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention.

Results: When comparing the above tests, the majority of the results pointed toward student's comfortability levels around caring for this patient population as increasing as well as the knowledge and   comfortability of using the tool as increasing.

Conclusion: Teaching students about this population and the SBIRT tool can improve the undergraduate nurses comfort level.

Recommendations: Incorporating more education about the substance use disorder population and SBIRT tool into the curriculum can improve the comfort of undergraduate nursing students. Future projects may involve investigating nursing students discomfort surrounding other specific patient populations.


E-46: Treatment of Substance Use Disorders without Judgement (Group 2)

Melanie Soller, Nursing
Phoebe Goodale, Nursing
Sarra Polisini, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Mohammad Othman
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Background: Currently, nursing professionals report feeling uncomfortable providing care to patients with substance use disorder due to a lack of education in the needs of this population.

Purpose: This project works to improve the comfort level of undergraduate nursing students in assessing, caring for, and referring patients with substance use disorder to treatment. In order to achieve this, undergraduate nursing students will be educated on the use of SBIRT, meaning Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment. This tool is used as a public health intervention to identify health risks, increase communication and coordination of care for patients with substance use disorder.

Method: A virtual teaching session that included an educational video and PowerPoint on this population and SBIRT usage was provided. A pretest and posttest were administered to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention.

Results: When comparing the above tests, the majority of the results pointed toward student's comfortability levels around caring for this patient population as increasing as well as the knowledge and comfortability of using the tool as increasing.

Conclusion: Teaching students about this population and the SBIRT tool can improve the undergraduate nurses comfort level. Recommendations: Incorporating more education about the substance use disorder population and SBIRT tool into the curriculum can improve the comfort of undergraduate nursing students. Future projects may involve investigating nursing students discomfort surrounding other specific patient populations.


E-47: Understanding and Dissecting Common Mental Health Biases and Their Effect on Patient Outcomes (Group 1)

Ellie Kuhlman, Nursing
Haley Duening , Nursing
Paige Gilliland, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Erin Barker
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Nearly 90% of people with mental illnesses claim that stigma and discrimination have a negative effect on their lives and more than half do not seek treatment due to these concerns. The purpose of this project is to inform nursing students of common biases nurses hold when caring for mental health patients and how these biases affect patient outcomes. We will conduct a 10 minute powerpoint presentation to educate undergraduate nursing students in a junior mental health course. We will discuss and dissect the topic of common mental health biases, analyze the effect they have on mental health patients, and evaluate interventions to reduce these biases. To assess the students' knowledge on mental health biases, a survey will be utilized before and after our education. The results of this study are pending. Conclusions are waiting to be drawn.


E-48: Understanding and Dissecting Common Mental Health Biases and Their Effect on Patient Outcomes (Group 2)

Kelly Byrne, Nursing
Alexandra Unger, Nursing
Rachel Seibert, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Paul Lewis
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Nearly 90% of people with mental illnesses claim that stigma and discrimination have a negative effect on their lives and more than half do not seek treatment due to these concerns. The purpose of this project is to inform nursing students of common biases nurses hold when caring for mental health patients and how these biases affect patient outcomes. We will conduct a 10 minute powerpoint presentation to educate undergraduate nursing students in a junior mental health course. We will discuss and dissect the topic of common mental health biases, analyze the effect they have on mental health patients, and evaluate interventions to reduce these biases. To assess the students' knowledge on mental health biases, a survey will be utilized before and after our education. The results of this study are pending. Conclusions are waiting to be drawn.


E-49: Warriors for Moms (Group 1)

Lizzie Zerhusen, Nursing
Jasmine Gibson, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Donna Green
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Would you have recognized changes if someone had not pointed out what to look for? The Center for Disease Control estimates that 10-15% of all new mothers experience postpartum depression (PPD). Many cases of postpartum depression are not recognized until the mothers are experiencing severe symptoms; we want to change that. Studies have suggested that postpartum depression in mothers of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admittees can be as common as 50%. This puts NICU nurses in the unique position to help a significant number of mothers who may experience PPD find help before reaching severe symptoms, and yet occupational education on PPD appears to be limited for NICU nurses. We intend to develop a supplemental education module to present to these nurses, as well as send a pre- and post-survey based on our teaching to see if anything has improved and what improved. We have unidentified conclusions and findings at this point in time.


E-50: Warriors for Moms (Group 2)

Miranda Borden, Nursing
Alyssa Eckman, Nursing
Project Advisor: Dr. Donna Green
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Would you have recognized changes if someone had not pointed out what to look for? The Center for Disease Control estimates that 10-15% of all new mothers experience postpartum depression (PPD). Many cases of postpartum depression are not recognized until the mothers are experiencing severe symptoms; we want to change that. Studies have suggested that postpartum depression in mothers of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admittees can be as common as 50%. This puts NICU nurses in the unique position to help a significant number of mothers who may experience PPD find help before reaching severe symptoms, and yet occupational education on PPD appears to be limited for NICU nurses. We intend to develop a supplemental education module to present to these nurses, as well as send a pre- and post-survey based on our teaching to see if anything has improved and what improved. We have unidentified conclusions and findings at this point in time.