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Goering Center honors region’s top businesses

Eighteen exemplary Greater Cincinnati family and private businesses were recognized, with six emerging as the region’s ‘best in class’

The top businesses in and around the Greater Cincinnati region were honored last evening at the 20th annual Goering Center Family and Private Business Awards at JACK Casino, Cincinnati. Nearly 700 people from the Goering Center for Family and Private Business network of business owners, volunteers, community leaders and corporate partners attended the celebration.

An independent panel of four judges selected businesses in each of six categories that were best able to articulate the legacy they sought to create and express how they fit into the fabric of a successful business community.

To be considered, companies were asked to provide thoughtful reflection and comment on a big business breakthrough that set their business on a new trajectory; an approach to leadership and employee development that shows their commitment to personal growth; how they shaped a culture for performance, inclusion and engagement; community development; and job growth and investment.

More than 500 businesses were nominated for the awards. An independent panel of judges had the challenging task of identifying 75 semifinalists, and then naming three finalists in each of three family and three private business divisions. The three finalists and the winner of each division were revealed at the awards ceremony.

The winners and finalists are:

Family Business Division

1-20 Employees:

21-100 Employees:

101+ Employees:

Private Business Division

1-20 Employees:

21-100 Employees:

101+ Employees:

This year’s judges were Mike Miller, LCNB National Bank; Paul Heagen, Defining Moments Consulting; Lisa Hinton, Mellott & Mellott, PLL; and Rex Wetherill, Hydrotech.

Awards were also given to businesses and individuals who have made a significant contribution to the Goering Center and Greater Cincinnati.

Home City Ice was inducted into the Goering Center’s Greater Cincinnati Family Business Hall of Fame in recognition of the contributions they have made to their industry, our community and as a model of everything the Goering Center values and teaches.

The Keith Baldwin Volunteer Award for 2019 was given to Jeanne Bruce. Bruce has spent a decade volunteering for the Goering Center, lending her expertise in branding and marketing to the Center’s efforts. Notably, she chaired an 18-month project to enhance the Goering Center brand and refine our marketing strategies. Her energy and big ideas helped shape the Goering Center that we know today.

Finally, Eric Arling, director of operations with Integrity Express Logistics, was named the 2019 recipient of the Larry Grypp Rising Leader Award.

An estimated 4,500 family and private businesses operate in the Cincinnati region. Membership in the Goering Center is not a prerequisite for the awards or for nominations.

About the Goering Center for Family & Private Business
Established in 1989, the Goering Center for Family & Private Business has become the country’s largest university based educational resource for family and private businesses.  The Center’s mission is to nurture and educate family and private businesses to drive a vibrant economy. Affiliation with the University of Cincinnati and the University of Cincinnati’s Carl H. Lindner College of Business enables access to a vast resource of business programing and expertise.  The Goering Center provides its membership real-world insights with the goal to enlighten, strengthen and prolong family business success.  For more information on the Center, participation and membership visit goering.uc.edu.

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