Vaccine Hesitancy: Public Trust, Expertise, and the War on Science March 31

A virtual discussion on the public acceptance of vaccinations

COVID-10 vaccines are currently undergoing strong public scrutiny, just as all vaccines have since the first vaccine, the smallpox vaccine, was introduced in 1796. This is the topic of an upcoming virtual talk featuring author Maya J. Goldenberg and her new book "Vaccine Hesitancy: Public Trust, Expertise, and the War on Science."

This virtual talk, taking place on March 31 at 7 p.m., is hosted by the University of Cincinnati’s Center for Public Engagement with Science (PEWS) and Cincinnati’s Mercantile Library and also sponsored by the Philosophy of Science Association (PSA).

headshot of Golenberg and Potochnik with a vaccine vial between them

Maya Goldenberg, a philosopher of science and medicine at the University of Guelph, and UC faculy member Angela Potochnik to discuss Goldenberg's newly published book about vaccine hesitancy.

“Among these organizations, we all share an interest in humanistic inquiry into science and into the roles science plays in our society. I like to think of these events as a way to highlight how we can use philosophy, history, and other humanistic approaches to deepen our understanding of science,” says Angela Potochnik, a UC professor of philosophy and director of UC’s Center for Public Engagement with Science.

At this event, Potochnik and Goldenberg will discuss public acceptance of vaccinations as a key component of the public’s interface with science.

Goldenberg is associate professor of philosophy in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Guelph. Her research centers on the philosophy of science and medicine, with interest in the connection between science and values.

Potochnik’s research addresses the nature of science and its successes, the relationships between science and the public, and methods in population biology. She is the author of "Idealization and the Aims of Science" (2017) and coauthor of "Recipes for Science" (2018), an introduction to scientific methods and reasoning. 

“We are thrilled to host Maya Goldenberg, a philosopher of science and medicine at the University of Guelph, to discuss her newly published book about vaccine hesitancy. Public acceptance of vaccinations is a key component of the public’s interface with science,” says Potochnik.

“It may be convenient to think that vaccine hesitancy is a result of the public’s limited understanding of science, but Goldenberg argues that it has more to do with challenging issues surrounding public trust of science. COVID-19 and ensuing vaccination efforts have brought these issues to the forefront of popular dialogue, and we’re thrilled to be hosting such a timely discussion.”

Register for the event.

Featured image at top of health care worker loading a syringe. Photo/Sam Moqadam/Unsplash.

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