Economic Times: Poorly fitted face masks can double infection risk

UC researchers say good fit makes all the difference in mask's protection from COVID-19

Economic Times reported on research at the University of Cincinnati that found poor-fitting face masks can double the risk of infection from airborne diseases such as COVID-19.

UC College of Engineering and Applied Science professor Rupak Banerjee and his co-authors used computerized tomography scans of three sizes of N95 face masks to identify gaps in the wear on three different sizes of mannequin heads.

They found that poorly fitting masks can have substantial leaks around the face that reduce their effectiveness and increase the risk of infection.

Their study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

“Many people do not realize that the fit of face masks can vary. There are different face shapes and different sizes of masks,” Banerjee said.

Read the Economic Times story.

Featured image at top: UC graduate student Israel Ajiboye wears an N95 face mask. Photo/Ravenna Rutledge/UC Creative + Brand

Professor Rupak Banerjee adjusts a face mask of a student model in his lab while another student looks on.

UC College of Engineering and Applied Science professor Rupak Banerjee adjusts a face mask on volunteer and UC graduate student Israel Ajiboye while grad student Shreyash Manegaonkar looks on during a demonstration in Banerjee's lab. Researchers found that a face mask's fit makes all the difference in protecting the wearer and others from infectious disease. Photo/Ravenna Rutledge/UC Creative + Brand