Spectrum News: Helping youth helps build resilient communities

UC pediatrics professor says the proper policies help pave the way for success

Researchers have identified a list of adverse childhood experiences, or ACES, that are major factors in lingering trauma. These ACES are negative events that, if too severe, raise a child’s stress levels.

In a story on Spectrum News, Robert Shapiro, MD, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the UC College of Medicine and ACES researcher talked about the importance of having the proper policies in place to help young people succeed. 

“Policy can go a long way towards building communities that support our youth,” Shapiro said. “Kids need to grow up in a world where they feel that there is hope, where there’s a chance for them to succeed.”

Robert Shapiro, MD, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the UC College of Medicine

Robert Shapiro, MD, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the UC College of Medicine/Photo/Cincinnati Children's

Shapiro was part an all day Mental Health Action Summin on October 12, sponsored by the Urban Health Pathway at UC.  

Featuring a mix of academic, professional, and community representatives, the summit used Nippert Stadium’s third floor open space to inspire collective thinking and creativity around a series of mental health topics.  

Specifically, the day featured a series of presentations from researchers and practitioners presenting data analysis on topics ranging from improving access to behavioral healthcare, stress management techniques, healthcare outreach to minority communities, and overviews of the state of research on trauma and stress.  

See the full story here

Lead photo/The Conversation

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