10 Results

What is Neuroscience?

November 5, 2021

Have you ever thought about thinking? Or have you been interested in how the brain works and makes us function? What about how the brain makes us behave? If you have, the neuroscience program at UC’s College of Arts & Sciences may be the right major for you. Neuroscience, by definition, is the study of the nervous system. While it is based on the nervous system, neuroscience includes many disciplines like physiology, anatomy, molecular biology, computer science and mathematical modeling. UC is one of the few schools in Ohio that offers a comprehensive major in neuroscience, and many students go on to careers in medicine, pharmaceutical or biotech research, or clinical psychology, to name a few. The neuroscience program in A&S has three focus areas: Brain, Mind & Behavior (thinking about thinking); Neurobiology (how the brain works); and Neuropsychology (how the brain makes us behave). Each focus area is a four-year program that confers a bachelor’s of science degree.

UC student body leaders use platform to empower others

October 28, 2021

University of Cincinnati student body leaders have taken on a full slate of undergraduate activities, including classes, studies, Bearcats games and leading student government for UC. Elected as president and vice president earlier this semester, the students set to work delivering on their platform of diversity and inclusion, sustainability, campus spirit, mental health and accessibility.  Initiatives so far include a Mental Health Advocacy Week, a career-ready clothing drive and civil discourse training.

Nontraditional students find their place at UC

September 28, 2021

Nontraditional students can be hard to define and even harder to teach in a traditional environment. UC’s College of Arts & Sciences makes it a point to offer flexible scheduling, learning and asynchronous options, aspects that helped Kathy Silbernagel and Al-Raheim Washington earn their liberal arts degrees this year. “In actual class setting, I saw little or no difference between my approach and those of my fellow classmates,” Silbernagel says. “If there is a difference it might be in that many—maybe most—students coming out of high school do not have clear career choices in mind and this was not an issue for me.” Nontraditional students are defined by one or more of seven characteristics: delayed enrollment in college; attends college part-time; works full time; is financially independent; has dependents other than a spouse; is a single parent; or does not have a high school diploma, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. How about a 70-year-old retired CEO and a family advocate and success coach in his mid-30s with a GED?

UC liberal arts alums share their journeys to success

September 13, 2021

As a first-year student moving into your transformative college days, you might find yourself wondering what the finish line looks like. Alumni from UC’s College of Arts and Sciences have stories to share—and prove through their own experiences that earning a liberal arts degree from A&S degree can unlock doors to countless, and sometimes unexpected, career paths. Here, discover some of the creative paths they carved to success.

Interdisciplinary Studies opens professional door for UC alum

September 3, 2021

By Rebecca Schweitzer      [COPY] For many students, college is a time of uncertainty and discovery. It is during these formative years that many learn where their interests lay and what future they hope to create for themselves. This was no different for A&S alumna, Jelanah Cheatham.    When Cheatham began at UC in 2014, she felt completely unsure about what career path she hoped to follow. She found herself switching majors multiple times and shifting her post-college aspirations every semester.     After a few semesters of this routine, Cheatham decided Interdisciplinary Studies seemed like a good option and concentrated her curriculum in Math, Marketing and Computer Science.    

UC team lands first place in first Ethics Bowl competition

March 4, 2021

It was a true Cinderella story. Competing for the first time in the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl, the University of Cincinnati beat out 36 other teams to win the 25th annual APPE competition. UC bested teams from Stanford University, Northwestern University and West Point, among others. “Shock, delight and pride,” Daniel Mattox, team coach and graduate instructor in philosophy, described his reaction. “It was unexpected that we kept winning, but I was delighted by the team’s efforts. They are so utterly brilliant and hard-working, and I’m so proud of everything they accomplished.” Organized by the UC College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Philosophy, the team qualified for the national competition in the Central State regionals last November. Participants on the UC team included Emma Duhamel, Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies major; Dom Duponty, Philosophy and Chemistry major; and Caitlin Powell, Philosophy and Spanish major.

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