Cincinnati ranked top city for recent college graduates

The Queen City reigns supreme for three years running on SmartAsset's annual list

For the third year in a row, Cincinnati tops a list of best cities for new college graduates, based on affordability, jobs and fun.

The Queen City ranks No. 1 on SmartAsset's "Best Cities for New College Grads – 2021 Edition." The annual list takes into account a number of factors centered around jobs, affordability and fun in the 106 largest U.S. cities.

Topping the list since 2019, Cincinnati finished seventh for affordability and tied at third for fun this year. The city has the eighth-lowest median monthly rent ($660) and the 12th-lowest cost of living ($19,713). Cincinnati also has the seventh-best Yelp bar scores (3.98) and ranks in the top 25% for jobs.

The news was covered by the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Business Courier, Fox 19 and more.

SmartAsset's best cities for new college grads

  1. Cincinnati, Ohio
  2. Columbus, Ohio
  3. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  4. St. Louis, Missouri
  5. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  6. Lexington, Kentucky
  7. Madison, Wisconsin
  8. Indianapolis, Indiana
  9. Nashville, Kentucky
  10. Louisville, Kentucky

Featured image at top: Joy Yocis/UC Creative + Brand

Related Stories

UC research sheds light on historically marginalized communities

May 12, 2022

At the University of Cincinnati’s College of Art and Sciences (A&S), students are often given the opportunity to complete in-depth research tailored to their individual interests. For two graduate students in the history department, this research included challenging the notion that the only research with impact is done by those in white lab coats. Maurice Adkins and Katherine Ranum have spent their graduate school years bringing to light stories of marginalized people, helping to fill gaps within U.S. historical studies. As a result, many institutions are taking notice of Adkins and Ranum, rewarding them with fellowships that allow them to continue their efforts to make historical research more inclusive. Adkins, a recent graduate from the history department’s doctorate program, spent seven years traveling between Cincinnati and North Carolina, scouring archives and hunting down public records to complete his dissertation, which explores Black leadership at historically Black col- leges and Universities (HBCUs) in North Carolina from 1863-1931. This quickly became laborious, Adkins says, due to the underfunding that many HBCUs have faced historically, resulting in poorer record keeping than that of other universities.

Debug Query for this