Medscape: Etiological differences underlie five subtypes of Type 2 diabetes

UC expert says study results are reassuring to clinicians

Genome-wide association analyses show Type 2 diabetes subtypes have partially distinct genetic backgrounds, suggesting etiological differences that may one day be targeted for treatment. In a story for Reuters Health published by Medscape, the lead author said the key finding of this paper is that each of these diabetes subtypes show partially distinct genetic associations, which indicates that there are some differences in the disease etiologies or causes of these subtypes.

Shailendra Patel, MD, PhD, professor and director of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC College of Medicine provided reaction to Reuters Health to the study findings. 

Shailendra Patel, MD, PhD, professor and director of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC College of Medicine

Shailendra Patel, MD, PhD, professor and director of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC College of Medicine/Photo/Colleen Kelley/UC Creative + Brand

"This is a fantastic study! It provides scientific evidence for what we see in the clinic - namely, that diabetes is not one disease, and there are subtypes that may need to be treated differently," he said. "Clinicians can be reassured that what they're doing now has robust science behind it."

"The results also tell us not to be so glucose-centric - that diabetes is essentially a metabolic disease and we have to look at the bigger picture," he said. "This approach may open the door to further subtypes and therapies based on the etiology."

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