Pre-Pharmacy Frequently Asked Questions

What does it mean to be pre-pharmacy?
  • You have the desire to become a pharmacist.
  • You are taking courses required by the pharmacy schools to which you hope to apply (two years or longer, depending on the school).
  • You are working with the PPAC by attending workshops and advising sessions.
  • You are exploring the field through employment or observation at a pharmacy, and by investigating alternative career options.
  • You are investigating admissions expectations of various colleges of pharmacy.
     
Which courses should I take?

Pre-Pharmacy Course Requirements for UC College of Pharmacy
2013-2014 prerequisite guide for UC undergraduates 
PSAR - Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements for all pharmacy programs
 

pharmacy
What resources are available to pre-pharmacy students?

UC Clifton/Main Pre-Pharmacy Students:  Your advisor is Robin Selzer.

UC Blue Ash Pre-Pharmacy Students:  Your advisor is Melinda Greer.

UC Clermont Pre-Pharmacy Students:  Your advisor is Margaret (Peggy) Hager.

Blackboard - A&S Pre-Pharmacy students - find the Pre-Pharmacy Major Information community using the "Community" tab once you've logged in to Blackboard. See announcements, academic resources, requirements for pharmacy programs, etc.
PharmPhacts- University of Cincinnati College of Pharmacy
AACP - The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Website provides you with a wealth of valuable information.
PCAT - Pharmacy College Admissions Test
PharmCAS - Pharmacy College Application Service
American Pharmacists Association - Educate yourself about current events and trends within the pharmacy profession.

Advising Tips

Advising is a partnership. Therefore, there are things we both need to do to make it a productive partnership. Here are 5 Advising tips to help us both be our best!

1) Prepare for the appointment. I should review your academic record and notes. You should call ahead if you need to cancel, prepare questions ahead of time etc.

2) We both should be present for the appointment…put away cell phones, take notes. We should both talk openly in the advising sessions. I should ask questions and you should be prepared to answer questions.

3) Don’t wait for the last minute to ask for help. I should be sending you resources and you should be proactive in taking advantage of them.

4) Be patient. Problems that need to be resolved require patience and professionalism on both of our parts. We should use etiquette in our written and oral communications to each other and others involved.

5) Follow-up. Let’s keep each other in the loop on things. I care about your success and want to celebrate the small wins with you along the way.