New Psychology Research Aims to Help Diverse Group of Those in Need

Research presentations from faculty and students in the University of Cincinnati's Department of Psychology were given at the

American Psychological Association's (APA) annual convention

, held Aug. 7-10 in Washington, D.C. More than 11,000 psychology professionals, scholars and students from around the world annually attend APA’s convention.

Among the UC research presentations were:

Looking Through the Glass Ceiling: Challenges and Strategies for Women Pursuing STEM Careers

Mary Jean Amon, a doctoral student in the University of Cincinnati’s psychology program, presented "Effect of Stereotype Activation on STEM Women’s Career Narratives." Her study uncovered three themes that emerged as women examined the effects of gender stereotypes in math- and science-related fields: career strategies, barriers to achievement and buffering strategies.

'Seeing' through Virtual Touch Is Believing

Luis Favela, a graduate student in philosophy and psychology, presented his research "Augmenting the Sensory Judgment Abilities of the Visually Impaired." Favela's research was aimed at visually impaired Americans, and his results could spark development of advanced tools to help this diverse and growing population navigate the blurred edges of everyday life.

Cultural Awareness May Help Students Fight Feelings of Phoniness

Assistant professor of psychology Bridgette Peteet's presentation "Racial Socialization As Protective Factor for Impostorism in African-American College Students" was based on research she co-authored. Her study of the “impostor phenomenon” may help African-American college students fight feelings of phoniness when it comes to their academic achievements.

Giving Women Their Voices: Breaking the Cycle of Victimhood

University of Cincinnati graduate student Chizara Ahuama-Jonas presented her research "Abuse History, Sexual Relationship Power, and Risky Sexual Behavior in Substance-Using Women." Ahuama-Jonas investigated whether sexual relationship power weakens the link between previous abuse and engaging in risky sexual behaviors.

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