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UC research institute hosts first annual festival of sensing

May 13, 2022

UC’s Institute for Research in Sensing (IRiS) hosts its first annual Expo & Festival of Sensing next month to convene an interdisciplinary conference exploring the topic of sensing in all its forms, from the sciences to the humanities.   The event will be held on May 25 and 26 in Tangeman University Center, 2600 Clifton Ave., and is open to faculty, staff, students and the public.   The conference brings together representatives from across disciplines—from engineering, biology, ethics, the humanities, performing arts and more—to explore sensing through a variety of lenses, says IRiS director and associate professor of biology Nathan Morehouse.   “We hope the IRiS event raises awareness of the amazing breadth of work happing on sensing at UC, while at the same time stimulating new conversations between the sciences, engineering, the arts and humanities,” he said.  

UC research sheds light on historically marginalized communities

May 12, 2022

At the University of Cincinnati’s College of Art and Sciences (A&S), students are often given the opportunity to complete in-depth research tailored to their individual interests. For two graduate students in the history department, this research included challenging the notion that the only research with impact is done by those in white lab coats. Maurice Adkins and Katherine Ranum have spent their graduate school years bringing to light stories of marginalized people, helping to fill gaps within U.S. historical studies. As a result, many institutions are taking notice of Adkins and Ranum, rewarding them with fellowships that allow them to continue their efforts to make historical research more inclusive. Adkins, a recent graduate from the history department’s doctorate program, spent seven years traveling between Cincinnati and North Carolina, scouring archives and hunting down public records to complete his dissertation, which explores Black leadership at historically Black col- leges and Universities (HBCUs) in North Carolina from 1863-1931. This quickly became laborious, Adkins says, due to the underfunding that many HBCUs have faced historically, resulting in poorer record keeping than that of other universities.

UC mock trial team makes elite national competition

May 11, 2022

Each spring, in hundreds of nondescript rooms across the country, around 700 collegiate mock trial teams compete. Team members collaborate to create compelling arguments, for both the mock defense and prosecution, to win their respective cases. Tensions run high and each team member must be fully prepared and in character to advance to the national competition. Only seven percent of all collegiate teams qualify, and UC’s team joined the elite competition this year for the first time since 2019, appearing in the American Mock Trial Association’s national championship in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in April. UC’s team is comprised mainly of students from the College of Arts and Science, with more than two-thirds of the nationals team enrolled in an A&S major. The UC Mock Trial Team had the unique opportunity of competing with all-female team with co-captains Divya Kumar and Zophia Pittman-Jones leading. Kumar, who has been on the team since her first year at UC, is a third-year history major. She was awarded an All-American Attorney Award at Nationals.

What is Arabic Studies? 

May 9, 2022

Have you ever considered learning another language? Exploring a different culture, religion, or society? If so, you may want to learn more about the Arabic Studies program offered through the University of Cincinnati. Encompassing twenty-two countries and Palestine, the Arab world has a population of about 300 million people, and more than a billion people use Arabic as a vital component of their daily lives. In fact, in 1974 the United Nations adopted Arabic as one of its six official languages. The Arabic world has strategic significance for the US government and military, creating a demand for its speakers and incentive for more learners. Offered through UC’s College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), Arabic Studies offers students a robust, topical course selection ranging from language and literature to explorations of Middle East politics.

UC leads demonstration project to improve Ohio streams

May 4, 2022

Biologists at the University of Cincinnati are studying low-cost ways to improve water quality and wildlife habitat in Greater Cincinnati’s creeks. UC biologists Stephen Matter and Michael Booth are examining whether water quality and wildlife habitat can be improved simply by adding logs and branches in select parts of the upper Cooper Creek. The addition of fallen timber could help slow periodic floodwaters, create more standing pools for fish during droughts and add nutrients for plants and fungus that support other aquatic life, researchers said.

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