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Cincinnati.com: Nose or throat swabs? Advice from doctors so you...

January 11, 2022

With COVID-19 cases surging thanks to the omicron variant, many people are turning to self-administered tests to see if they have the virus. Some who do their own research about the tests online, may find a wide variety of theories on the best way to administer the tests. In an article published by Cincinnati.com, Carl Fichtenbaum, MD, of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the UC College of Medicine answers some questions about how to make the most of a home COVID-19 test.

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Cincinnati.com: Nose or throat swabs? Advice from doctors so you...

January 11, 2022

With COVID-19 cases surging thanks to the omicron variant, many people are turning to self-administered tests to see if they have the virus. Some who do their own research about the tests online, may find a wide variety of theories on the best way to administer the tests. In an article published by Cincinnati.com, Carl Fichtenbaum, MD, of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the UC College of Medicine answers some questions about how to make the most of a home COVID-19 test.

Healthline: How to safely plan a holiday gathering during the...

December 15, 2021

As the holiday season approaches, a new COVID-19 variant has come knocking on the door, potentially disrupting plans for many. The omicron variant was discovered at the end of November, and researchers are still studying it to better understand its transmissibility as well as the effect of vaccines on neutralizing the virus. Experts say the omicron variant appears to spread far faster than other COVID variants. They remain unsure if it leads to less severe symptoms than other variants. Despite the rise of the new variant, experts say it’s still possible to celebrate over the holidays. But they stress that it is best to take safety measures to protect everyone’s health while enjoying holiday traditions. In a story published by Healthline, one of the experts quoted on staying safe during holiday gatherings is Carl Fichtenbaum, MD, of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the UC College of Medicine.

HuffPost: Parosmia: The long COVID condition that makes...

December 10, 2021

Parosmia is a post-COVID-19 condition that can make once-pleasant foods and scents smell and taste disgusting, in some instances like sewage, garbage or smoke. The condition is being reported in increasing numbers. HuffPost published a story on parosmia, citing the case of a 20-year-old woman who has posted several TikTok videos on her experiences with the condition. One of the experts cited in the article is Ahmad Sedaghat, MD, PhD, associate professor and director of the Division of Rhinology, Allergy and Anterior Skull Base Surgery in the UC College of Medicine.

Atlanta Journal Constitution: Ointment kills...

December 3, 2021

The Atlanta Journal Constitution published a story on research at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine possibly adding a weapon to hospitals’ bacteria fighting arsenal.Using the topical drug called AB569 — a combination of acidified nitrite and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid — promotes killing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria while enhancing the healing of wounds in a variety of burn injuries, the study found. The study was published in the journal Infection and Immunity.

Dallas Morning News: Families separated at the U.S.-Mexico...

November 30, 2021

New research on the forcible separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border, shows that many parents and children showed long-term, serious mental health disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression. In a story on the study, the Dallas Morning News interviewed several expert sources, including Maria Espinola, PsyD, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the UC College of Medicine.

Medscape: Etiological differences underlie five subtypes of Type...

November 19, 2021

In a story for Reuters Health published by Medscape, it was reported that Type 2 diabetes subtypes have partially distinct genetic backgrounds, suggesting etiological differences that may one day be targeted for treatment. That was the conclusion of genome-wide association analyses. Shailendra Patel, MD, PhD, professor and director of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC College of Medicine provided reaction to the study.

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