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UC research examines coping mechanisms for loss of smell from...

October 21, 2021

One of the most common and disturbing side effects of COVID-19 is the loss of the sense of smell. New research from UC found some common coping mechanisms that helped COVID patients deal with a lessened sense of smell, which severely impacts the sense of taste. The study was published in the International Forum of Allergies and Rhinology. The combination of the loss of smell and taste, which are also known as the chemosensory senses, due to COVID-19 has been particularly devastating, with research showing associated depression, anxiety and impaired quality of life. It is something Katie Phillips, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery at the UC College of Medicine sees in many COVID patients who come into her clinic.

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UC research examines coping mechanisms for loss of smell from...

October 21, 2021

One of the most common and disturbing side effects of COVID-19 is the loss of the sense of smell. New research from UC found some common coping mechanisms that helped COVID patients deal with a lessened sense of smell, which severely impacts the sense of taste. The study was published in the International Forum of Allergies and Rhinology. The combination of the loss of smell and taste, which are also known as the chemosensory senses, due to COVID-19 has been particularly devastating, with research showing associated depression, anxiety and impaired quality of life. It is something Katie Phillips, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery at the UC College of Medicine sees in many COVID patients who come into her clinic.

Medscape: Booster shot back-and-forth creates uncertainty,...

October 4, 2021

In the wake of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announcements about who is authorized to get a third or 'booster' shot of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, many people, patients and providers alike, are confused. In an article on the topic, Medscape interviewed Louito Edje, MD, associate dean of graduate medical education at the UC College of Medicine who said that confusion could make some people reluctant to get the vaccine.

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