UC Clermont helps community during COVID-19 crisis

College provides aid to students; PPE for frontline workers

doctor poses in face mask and shield

Petra Hackenberg-Bauer, MD, pediatrician at Anderson Hills Pediatrics, models the new face shields created by UC Clermont manufacturing engineering faculty.

UC Clermont College faculty, staff, students and alumni have stepped up during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide crucial services and support to students, community members and frontline workers.

Since the COVID-19 crisis began in March, 15 students have received nearly $15,000 in aid from UC Clermont’s Sauls Stay-in-School Fund, which was established in 1990 by James E. Sauls Sr. to assist students with unanticipated financial needs. Emergencies such as car repairs, unexpected medical expenses or family job loss can affect a student’s ability to attend class and complete academic work. 

“When classes were forced to transition to remote delivery in March, some students found themselves unprepared and lacking the technology to learn from home,” said Dawn Hundley, associate director of UC Clermont’s One Stop Student Services and financial aid. “The generosity of the Saul’s family allowed us to help the students continue their educational journey by supplying funds to provide Internet, webcams and laptops. Without this funding, students would have been forced to withdraw from the spring semester.”

In addition, the UC Clermont Food Pantry assisted nearly 50 students and their families with more than $5,000 in essential food and personal care items in April and May. The pantry and Sauls fund have received approximately $43,000 in donations since the pandemic began. And the donations — and need — continue.

“UC Clermont is grateful to the many individuals who have donated to the UC Clermont Food Pantry. With these funds, we have been able to provide critical resources to students during a difficult and uncertain time,” said Jennifer Radt, senior director of student affairs and services. “Our students are humbled by the support they have received and are thankful that food was not something they had to worry about during this pandemic.”

UC Clermont faculty and staff have helped equip local healthcare workers with the tangible tools they need, too. In April, UC Clermont’s Manufacturing Engineering Technology program faculty used 3-D printers to produce face shields and mask extenders for the medical staff at Anderson Hills Pediatrics.

“I knew we had the technology and capability to help in some way,” said Assistant Professor Chris Goodman, program coordinator for the college’s manufacturing engineering program. “It was just a matter of determining which devices our technology was best suited for and verifying that need. Our community has been supportive of our program, so it was very important for us to help in any way we could.”

The effort is just one example of personal protective equipment donations from the college. Since March, UC Clermont has donated approximately:

  • 18,000 gloves
  • 1,500 masks
  • 120 pairs of safety goggles
  • 100 disposable surgical gowns
  • 2,000 sterile cotton swabs
  • 65 lab coats

In addition to Anderson Hills Pediatrics, recipients included UC Health and Mercy Anderson.

“UC Clermont is an integral part of the community, and we are delighted that we could help protect frontline healthcare providers with PPE during this challenging time,” said Dean Jeff Bauer. “We are also extremely grateful for the generosity of the community, which has enabled us to provide substantial financial support for our students so they can focus on their studies and prepare to take leadership roles in the community.”