International media reports on thirdhand smoke research

Researchers find that stepping outside to smoke, or smoking in a room away from the kids, doesn’t prevent exposure

Recently published research by University of Cincinnati professors with the College of Medicine and the School of Human Services has gained worldwide attention. 

Cincinnati Children's attending physician Melinda Mahabee-Gittens and UC assistant professor Ashley Merianos found that not smoking around children doesn’t stop the children of smokers from being exposed to nicotine. They also found that that higher levels of exposure to tobacco smoke residue — which likely includes carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines — may be linked to respiratory problems.

Media coverage

person holding cigarette

Photo courtesy FiveAA (Australian Radio)

Their findings earned media coverage from news outlets in the United States, Asia, and Australia.

Image at top: photo by Julie Bocchino/Creative Commons

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