IT@UC Office of Information Security to Hold Fall Shred Event

IT@UC Office of Information Security is providing a document shredding event for all students, faculty, and staff on Wednesday, Oct. 25. Bring any personal or professional documents like tax forms, bank statements, credit reports and any other documents you want securely destroyed and recycled to McMicken Commons between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. or until the truck is full for the Office of Information Security's Fall Shred Event.

All metal, including paper clips and hanging file folders, must be removed before dropping off documents to shred. Staples can remain on the documents, but all plastic needs to be removed as well. Anything that can’t be torn isn’t allowed. 

University records must be destroyed in compliance with the university’s records management policy. Information on proper destruction of university records may be found here or by contacting the University Records Manager.

For more information on the Shred Event, visit the Information Security webpage.

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