The New York Times: Riots long ago, luxury living today

UC faculty member speaks to the transformation of urban neighborhoods with scarred pasts

Rioting in the 1960s depressed the value of Black-owned property in central cities for years afterward. As a result, the racial gap in property values between white and Black homeowners widened more in cities with severe riots.

In a NYT article about the redevelopment and gentrification of urban properties, David Stradling, a professor of urban history at UC, points to Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood as an example of development after the city's 2001 riots.

“Cincinnati winds up with a collection of 19th-century buildings out of neglect rather than by purposeful preservation.”

>Read the article here

Featured image of Washington D.C. riots after the assination of MLK. Photo/Matthew Lewis/The Washington Post, via Getty Images 

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