WATCH: CCM presents 'Microphone Shootout' mini documentary

Enjoy a quick look at CCM faculty member Aaron Almashy's audio/sound production class

Enjoy a behind-the-scenes look at the work that goes into CCM performances courtesy of the new Backstage at CCM documentary series.

A companion piece to The Cello Lesson mini documentary, Microphone Shootout takes viewers inside one of CCM faculty member Aaron Almashy's audio/sound production classes as he and his students record student cellist Audrey Hudgens' lesson with CCM faculty member and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra cellist Alan Rafferty.

The Microphone Shootout behind-the-scenes video was created by students and faculty members from CCM's Media Production Division. Watch the mini documentary below.

As the largest undergraduate program at CCM, Media Production majors are uniquely positioned within a creative culture at CCM that fosters collaborations with actors, musicians, dancers, set designers and other performing artists as they develop their digital storytelling skills for film, television, internet and mobile media distribution.


Featured image: Aaron Almashy works with students in a scene from the CCM mini documentary Microphone Shootout.

There's More To Explore!

Watch recent CCM performances on demand by visiting our website.

Looking for CCM's School, Stage & Screen podcast? Tune in here.

Additional Contacts

Rebecca Butts | Assistant Public Information Officer | UC College-Conservatory of Music

| 513-556-2675

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