Fitness-Focused. Fun Encouraged!

Community is at the heart of Campus Recreation. 

In addition to offering an award-winning fitness facility, Campus Recreation strives to be a place where members can connect with one another in a safe and positive environment - a place where everyone feels welcome. 

We know movement and recreational activities help improve mental and physical health, add balance, reduce fatigue, restore energy, and improve self-confidence. 

Campus Recreation’s 212,000 square feet offer so many ways for members to get active – from cardio and weight equipment, to group fitness, swimming pools, a climbing wall and more.  Explore all Campus Recreation has to offer!

Campus Recreation Center

Cincinnati’s Campus Recreation Center (CRC) is a state-of-the-art fitness and recreation facility on its Uptown West Campus. With over 200,000 square feet of recreation space, the CRC offers university students, employees and friends of the university a wide range of exercise and fitness opportunities.

Fitness Center at CARE/Crawley

The Fitness Center (FC) at CARE/Crawley on Eden Avenue at the Medical Campus offers 12,000 square feet of fitness and wellness space. The FC offers membership options for everyone including UC students and employees, university affiliates (e.g., Children’s Hospital) and community members.

Latest News

1

Camp aims to empower children, teens who stutter

July 17, 2024

A one-week, evidence-based program for children and teens who stutter at the University of Cincinnati will teach kids to communicate effectively, advocate for themselves and develop confidence about their communication abilities. Camp Dream. Speak. Live., which is coming to Cincinnati for the first time July 22-26, began in 2014 at the University of Texas at Austin. The Arthur M. Blank Center for Stuttering Education and Research at UT expects to serve more than 2,000 children at camps across the United States, Africa, Asia and Europe this year.

3

U.S. stroke survival is improving, but race still plays role

July 16, 2024

U.S. News & World Report, HealthDay and Real Health covered new research from the University of Cincinnati that found overall rates of long-term survival following stroke are improving, but Black individuals experience worse long-term outcomes compared to white individuals.

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